eutrophicationmurray

eutrophicationmurray - EUTROPHICATION etc READINGS FREEMAN...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EUTROPHICATION, etc. READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 54 Pages 1261-1262
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EUTROPHICATION Eutrophication is the accumulation of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. It alters the dynamics of a number of plant, animal and bacterial populations; thus, bringing about changes in community structure. It is a form of water pollution and like all other forms of pollution is the result of human activities influencing ecological cycles.
Image of page 2
POLLUTION Pollution is the contamination of the environment by humans adding any substance or energy. Heavy metals, gases, oil, sewage, noise, heat, radiation and pesticides are common pollutants that can affect the environment adversely. A pollutant is any matter or energy introduced by human activities that produces harmful effects on resident populations thus altering community structure.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Pollutants, Population Dynamics and Community Structure Pollutants may be toxic (effect survival and/or reproduction of individuals) thus directly affect population dynamics. 1. Radioactive Atoms (Radioisotopes) ….. I 131 , St 90 , etc. 2. Heavy Metals ….. Cu, Hg, Pb, etc. 3. Man-made Organic Molecules ….. DDT, PCB’s, Dioxin, 2-4-5 T, etc.
Image of page 4
Pollutants, Population Dynamics and Community Structure Pollutants may alter the abiotic environment thus indirectly affect population dynamics 1. Increases in Atmospheric Gases …ozone (smog, uv radiation) …sulfur dioxide (acid rain) …CO 2 (greenhouse effect) …ammonia/nitrates (nitrogen deposition) 2. Waste Heat (thermal pollution) 3. Nutrient Enrichment (eutrophication)
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Trophic Transfer, Biological Magnification and Toxic Substances I The movement on compounds (molecules) through trophic levels is called trophic transfer. Toxic substances, like nutrients, can be transferred through trophic levels. Substances that can not be metabolized are particularly suitable for trophic transfer, as are radioactive atoms.
Image of page 6
Trophic Transfer, Biological Magnification and Toxic Substances II Biological magnification is the increase in concentration of a substance in successive members of a food chain. Toxic substances may accumulate in members of higher trophic levels as a result of biomagnification. Two classic examples of substance that are biomagnified are 1) Strontium 90 and 2) DDT.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Trophic Transfer and Biological Magnification of Strontium 90 I St 90 is a radioactive material with a 1/2 life of 28.1 years. Half life is a measure of how long it will take for the mass of the substance to decrease over time. For example, a kilogram of a radioactive compound with a 1/2 life of 10 years will weigh one half of a kilogram is left to sit from 1996 to 2006. By 2016, it will weigh one quarter of a kilogram.
Image of page 8
Trophic Transfer and Biological Magnification of Strontium 90 I St 90 is a radioactive material with a 1/2 life of 28.1 years.
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern