lifemurray - LIFE HISTORY AND HARVESTING READINGS: FREEMAN,...

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LIFE HISTORY AND HARVESTING READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 52 Pages 1206-1213 Chapter 54 Pages 1277-1283
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ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES Endangered means a species that is in danger or extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Threatened means a species that is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. The Endangered Species Act (EAS) was passed in 1973 to protect listed species for the “esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people”.
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WILDLIFE PROTECTION IN NATIONAL PARKS
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WILDLIFE REFUGES AND WILDERNESS AREAS In addition to the National Parks, Federal public lands include National Wildlife and Wilderness Areas that act to provide habitat for threatened and endangered species. Of the 700 million acres (about 1/3 of the US), that are in the public domain about 170 million are devoted to this preservation effort.
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Larger Preserves Provide Greater Protection Against Extinction A study has followed mammal extinctions in National Parks in the US and Canada. Species loss in 14 western North American National Parks is consistent with the species area relationships seen earlier. Number of extinctions was greatest in smallest parks. Newmark, 1987
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CHANGING SURVIVORSHIP AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL Age specific mortality and natality data can be used to make management decisions in harvesting or conserving wildlife populations. Assume that a population of interest is growing at too high a rate, what are the consequences of harvesting old versus young individuals on changing the rate of population growth?
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MANAGING A GRAY SQUIRREL POPULATION This squirrel population living in an Ohio woodlot has a type II survivorship curve. Typical of a population with accidental death.
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MANAGING A GRAY SQUIRREL POPULATION Squirrel populations begin reproduction at the end of the first year and continues throughout life. The average number of offspring produced decreases with age.
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A GRAY SQUIRREL POPULATION X l x m x l x m x 0-1 1.00 0 0 1-2 0.796 1.55 1.23 2-3 0.344 1.35 0.46 3-4 0.151 1.25 0.19 4-5 0.054 1.20 0.06 5-6 0.011 1.15 0.01
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A GRAY SQUIRREL POPULATION X l x m x l x m x 0-1 1.00 0 0 1-2 0.796 1.55 1.23 2-3 0.344 1.35 0.46 3-4 0.151 1.25 0.19 4-5 0.054 1.20 0.06 5-6 0.011 1.15 0.01 Ro = 1.95
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIOS 101 taught by Professor Molumby during the Spring '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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lifemurray - LIFE HISTORY AND HARVESTING READINGS: FREEMAN,...

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