trophicmurray

trophicmurray - TROPHIC STRUCTURE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005...

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TROPHIC STRUCTURE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 54 Pages 1243-1247
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ECOSYSTEM COMMUNITY PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT ECOSYSTEM
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ECOSYSTEM Consists of a community and its physical environment. The non-living (abiotic) components of an ecosystem include air, water and soil. Ecosystem scientists seek to study the physics and chemistry of how energy flows and nutrients cycle. Among the practical problems that they address are global warming and pollution.
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ECOSYSTEM Matter and energy are continually moving from the physical environment through living things and back into the physical environment. Energy flows. Matter recycles.
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ECOSYSTEM The muscle you move when you blink is powered by the energy you borrowed from a plant or animal that in turn got it from the sun. It is now dissipated in the form of low grade heat; no longer to be used by an other living or non-living thing.
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ECOSYSTEM Each breath you take is a reminder of the fact that matter cycles. The oxygen you take from the air is combined with the carbon you got from a plant or animal and put back into the air.
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TROPHIC STRUCTURE Trophic structure is the pattern of movement of energy and matter through an ecosystem. It is the result of compressing a community food web into a series of trophic levels.
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TROPIC STRUCTURE For example, the biomass of all species found in the green and brown food webs from Hubbard Brook could be combined into producer and consumer groups to form a trophic structure diagram.
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Some of the Producers in the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem
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Some of the 1 o Consumers in the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem
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Some of the Decomposers and Detritivores in the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem
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Most Species Occupy More Than One Trophic Level in the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem
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The result of combining all producers and consumers in Hubbard Brook would be a biomass pyramid. Since consumers can be at several trophic levels, the fraction of the food they consume at each trophic level is determined and proportioned among levels. PRODUCERS
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIOS 101 taught by Professor Molumby during the Spring '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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trophicmurray - TROPHIC STRUCTURE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005...

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