33 Early Women’s Rights Movement.pdf - Name Francisco Layme...

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NameFrancisco LaymeEarly Women’s Rights MovementAnalysisObjectiveWhat were the arguments for and against women participating intheabolitionist movement? How did the abolitionist movementlead to the early women’s rights movement?WRITE NOW: Read the historical context on the women’s rights movement in the box below.When you are done, answer the two analysis questions that follow.Historical Context: Abolition Movement & Women’s Rights MovementThe abolitionist movement enabled women to carve out a place in the public sphere.Womenattended anti-slavery meetings and circulated petitions to Congress.Most prominent duringthe 1830’s were Angelina and Sarah Grimke, the daughters of a South Carolina slave owner.The women had been converted to Quakerism and abolitionism while visiting Philadelphia.They began to deliver popular lectures that offered a scathing condemnation of slavery fromthe perspective of those who had witnessed it.The sight of women lecturing in public tomixed female and male audiences and taking part in public debate on political questionsaroused considerable criticism.- Eric FonerVoices of Freedom (Volume one, Third Edition - 2011).Contextualization:In the historical context, historian Eric Foner writes: “The sight of womenlecturing in public to mixed female and male audiences and taking part in public debate onpolitical questions aroused considerable criticism.”Thinking about the historical context,gender roles, and American society in 1830, why do you think women speaking out in publicagainst slavery caused so much agitation?It’s because they would notice many men would not like the idea of women protesting aboutslavery.Primary Source Document Analysis - Directions:You have been assigned to read primarysource documents 1 and 2Read the documents carefully and answer the accompanyingquestions.Primary Source Document 1: Catharine Beecher on the “Duty of American Females”(1837)-In 1836, Abolitionist and Women’s Rights leader Angelina Grimke wroteAppeal to
the Christian Women of the South,urging them to take a stand against slavery.CatherineBeecher wrote the piece excerpted below in response.

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Term
Fall
Professor
lancaster
Tags
American Civil War, Abolitionism

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