HW 3 - John Stuart Mill, a great philosopher in the 1800's,...

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John Stuart Mill, a great philosopher in the 1800’s, set about explaining his theory of life as well as his theory of morality in his work Utilitarianism (1863). Both theories are different and yet the theory of morality arose from his theory of life. In Mill’s theory of life, he clearly states that “pleasure and freedom from pain are the only things desirable as ends.” Psychologically, it would make sense that any human being would rather be in the state of pleasure rather than pain. This is the “is”. On the other hand, Mill’s theory of morality naturally follows, or qualifies, his theory of life by saying that there are “rules and precepts for human conduct.” This clearly is the “ought”. Man therefore, desires the “is” but has to attain it by obeying the rules of the “ought”. The theory of morality states that the theory of life must have boundaries. All men have the desire for happiness and the absence of pain; however Mill wants man to realize that while attempts at attaining this goal are natural, man must have limits as to how they attain happiness and pleasure. Mills wants us to be realistic about happiness. He refers to this throughout the text when
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HW 3 - John Stuart Mill, a great philosopher in the 1800's,...

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