Philosophy of Education

Philosophy of Education - Did I make myself better today in...

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Brent Mansingh Doctor Beckers February 17, 2008 Attendance Paper Philosophy of Education Aristotle, one of the greatest minds ever, said, “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” After carefully lingering on each word, I came to a few quick conclusions. The first was, “Aristotle is a genius!” This ability sets us apart for animals, and sets choice apart from ignorance. When I am learning, I always test my ability to go from point A, to point B. That is, at the end of every assessment I ask myself, did I learn something?
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Unformatted text preview: Did I make myself better today in class? Or, did I sell myself short by not reading the book? And the second, this is what I believe education should consist of. Teachers should be able to measure every individual as they excel through a course. It has become very evident that most teachers and schools have gotten caught up in standardized test scores as opposed to how much each individual student has learned. Not all students test well, so it is not always fair to judge their knowledge based on their scores....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course EDCI 2001 taught by Professor Beckers during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

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Philosophy of Education - Did I make myself better today in...

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