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The enter instruction generates this exception when

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Unformatted text preview: Recovery from this exception is possible merely by setting the present flag in the gate descriptor. If a segment-not-present exception occurs during a task switch, it can occur before or after the commit-to-new-task point (refer to Section 6.3., “Task Switching” in Chapter 6, Task Management). If it occurs before the commit point, no program state change occurs. If it occurs after the commit point, the processor will load all the state information from the new TSS (without performing any additional limit, present, or type checks) before it generates the exception. The segment-not-present exception handler should thus not rely on being able to use the segment selectors found in the CS, SS, DS, ES, FS, and GS registers without causing another exception. (Refer to the Program State Change description for “Interrupt 10—Invalid TSS Exception (#TS)” in this chapter for additional information on how to handle this situation.) 5-38 INTERRUPT AND EXCEPTION HANDLING Interrupt 12—Stack Fault Exception (#SS) Exception Class Description Indicates that one of the following stack related conditions was detected: Fault. • A limit violation is detected during an operation that refers to the SS register. Operations that can cause a limit violation include stack-oriented instructions such as POP, PUSH, CALL, RET, IRET, ENTER, and LEAVE, as well as other memory references which implicitly or explicitly use the SS register (for example, MOV AX, [BP+6] or MOV AX, SS:[EAX+6]). The ENTER instruction generates this exception when there is not enough stack space for allocating local variables. A not-present stack segment is detected when attempting to load the SS register. This violation can occur during the execution of a task switch, a CALL instruction to a different privilege level, a return to a different privilege level, an LSS instruction, or a MOV or POP instruction to the SS register. • Recovery from this fault is possible by either extending the limit of the stack segment (in the case of a limit violation) or loading the missing stack segment into memory (in the case of a notpresent violation. Exception Error Code If the exception is caused by a not-present stack segment or by overflow of the new stack during an inter-privilege-level call, the error code contains a segment selector for the segment that caused the exception. Here, the exception handler can test the present flag in the segment descriptor pointed to by the segment selector to determine the cause of the exception. For a normal limit violation (on a stack segment already in use) the error code is set to 0. Saved Instruction Pointer The saved contents of CS and EIP registers generally point to the instruction that generated the exception. However, when the exception results from attempting to load a not-present stack segment during a task switch, the CS and EIP registers point to the first instruction of the new task. Program State Change A program-state change does not generally accompany a stack-fault exception, because the instruction that generated the fault is not executed. Here, the instruction can be restarted after the exception handler has corrected the stack fault condition. If a stack fault occurs during a task switch, it occurs after the commit-to-new-task point (refer to Section 6.3., “Task Switching” Chapter 6, Task Management). Here, the processor loads all the state information from the new TSS (without performing any additional limit, present, or 5-39 INTERRUPT AND EXCEPTION HANDLING type checks) before it generates the exception. The stack fault handler should thus not rely on being able to use the segment selectors found in the CS, SS, DS, ES, FS, and GS registers without causing another exception. The exception handler should check all segment registers before trying to resume the new task; otherwise, general protection faults may result later under conditions that are more difficult to diagnose. (Refer to the Program State Change description for “Interrupt 10—Invalid TSS Exception (#TS)” in this chapter for additional information on how to handle this situation.) 5-40 INTERRUPT AND EXCEPTION HANDLING Interrupt 13—General Protection Exception (#GP) Exception Class Description Indicates that the processor detected one of a class of protection violations called “generalprotection violations.” The conditions that cause this exception to be generated comprise all the protection violations that do not cause other exceptions to be generated (such as, invalid-TSS, segment-not-present, stack-fault, or page-fault exceptions). The following conditions cause general-protection exceptions to be generated: Fault. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Exceeding the segment limit when accessing the CS, DS, ES, FS, or GS segments. Exceeding the segment limit when referencing a descriptor table (except during a task switch or a stack switch). Transferring execution to a segment that is not executable. Writing to a code segmen...
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2013 for the course ECE 1234 taught by Professor Kwhon during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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