IntelSoftwareDevelopersManual

This chapter discusses only the jmp call and ret

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Unformatted text preview: he stack-segment descriptor must be the same. If the RPL and DPL are not equal to the CPL, a general-protection exception (#GP) is generated. 4.8. PRIVILEGE LEVEL CHECKING WHEN TRANSFERRING PROGRAM CONTROL BETWEEN CODE SEGMENTS To transfer program control from one code segment to another, the segment selector for the destination code segment must be loaded into the code-segment register (CS). As part of this loading process, the processor examines the segment descriptor for the destination code segment and performs various limit, type, and privilege checks. If these checks are successful, the CS register is loaded, program control is transferred to the new code segment, and program execution begins at the instruction pointed to by the EIP register. Program control transfers are carried out with the JMP, CALL, RET, INT n, and IRET instructions, as well as by the exception and interrupt mechanisms. Exceptions, interrupts, and the IRET instruction are special cases discussed in Chapter 5, Interrupt and Exception Handling. This chapter discusses only the JMP, CALL, and RET instructions. A JMP or CALL instruction can reference another code segment in any of four ways: • • The target operand contains the segment selector for the target code segment. The target operand points to a call-gate descriptor, which contains the segment selector for the target code segment. 4-12 PROTECTION • • The target operand points to a TSS, which contains the segment selector for the target code segment. The target operand points to a task gate, which points to a TSS, which in turn contains the segment selector for the target code segment. The following sections describe first two types of references. Refer to Section 6.3., “Task Switching” in Chapter 6, Task Management for information on transferring program control through a task gate and/or TSS. 4.8.1. Direct Calls or Jumps to Code Segments The near forms of the JMP, CALL, and RET instructions transfer program control within the current code segment, so privilege-level checks are not performed. The far forms of the JMP, CALL, and RET instructions transfer control to other code segments, so the processor does perform privilege-level checks. When transferring program control to another code segment without going through a call gate, the processor examines four kinds of privilege level and type information (refer to Figure 4-5): • The CPL. (Here, the CPL is the privilege level of the calling code segment; that is, the code segment that contains the procedure that is making the call or jump.) CS Register CPL Segment Selector For Code Segment RPL Destination Code Segment Descriptor DPL C Privilege Check Figure 4-5. Privilege Check for Control Transfer Without Using a Gate • • • The DPL of the segment descriptor for the destination code segment that contains the called procedure. The RPL of the segment selector of the destination code segment. The conforming (C) flag in the segment descriptor for the destination code segment, which determines whether the segment is a conforming (C flag is set) or nonconforming (C flag is clear) code segment. (Refer to Section 3.4.3.1., “Code- and Data-Segment Descriptor 4-13 PROTECTION Types” in Chapter 3, Protected-Mode Memory Management for more information about this flag.) The rules that the processor uses to check the CPL, RPL, and DPL depends on the setting of the C flag, as described in the following sections. 4.8.1.1. ACCESSING NONCONFORMING CODE SEGMENTS When accessing nonconforming code segments, the CPL of the calling procedure must be equal to the DPL of the destination code segment; otherwise, the processor generates a general-protection exception (#GP). For example, in Figure 4-6, code segment C is a nonconforming code segment. Therefore, a procedure in code segment A can call a procedure in code segment C (using segment selector C1), because they are at the same privilege level (the CPL of code segment A is equal to the DPL of code segment C). However, a procedure in code segment B cannot call a procedure in code segment C (using segment selector C2 or C1), because the two code segments are at different privilege levels. Code Segment B CPL=3 Segment Sel. D2 RPL=3 Segment Sel. C2 RPL=3 3 Lowest Privilege Code Segment A CPL=2 Segment Sel. C1 RPL=2 Segment Sel. D1 RPL=2 Code Segment C DPL=2 Nonconforming Code Segment 2 Code Segment D DPL=3 Conforming Code Segment 1 0 Highest Privilege Figure 4-6. Examples of Accessing Conforming and Nonconforming Code Segments From Various Privilege Levels 4-14 PROTECTION The RPL of the segment selector that points to a nonconforming code segment has a limited effect on the privilege check. The RPL must be numerically less than or equal to the CPL of the calling procedure for a successful control transfer to occur. So, in the example in Figure 4-6, the RPLs of segment selectors C1 and C2 could legally be set to 0, 1, or 2, but not to 3. When the segment selector of a nonconforming code segment is loaded into the CS register, the privilege level field is not changed; that is, it remains at the CPL (which is the privilege level o...
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2013 for the course ECE 1234 taught by Professor Kwhon during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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