Soviet Montage

Soviet Montage - Soviet Cinema In the 1920s The Hardships...

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Soviet Cinema In the 1920s The Hardships of War Communism, 1918-1920: 1. Soviet production, distribution, and exhibition were disorganized. Many companies fled during revolution---took equipment and raw stock with them. Lack of materials… Most films made were agikit —brief propaganda films with pro-soviet messages. 2. Filmmaker Kuleshov obtained rare raw stock—experimentation led to Kuleshov effect —based on leaving out a scene’s establishing shot and leading the spectator to infer spatial or temporal continuity from the shots of separate elements. Recovery Under the New Economic Policy, 1921-1924: 1. NEP allowed a limited and temporary reintroduction of private ownership and capitalist-style dealings---resulted in reappearance of hoarded stock, and increase in film production by private firms and government groups. Increased State Control and The montage Movement, 1925-1930: Growth and Export in the Film Industry: 1. Faced with problem of expanding access to films throughout USSR. How to pay? –Led to strong incentive to export films. Films such as Potemkin found an audience in the West, and the income that these exports generated bought new equipment and supported the expansion of the industry. The Influence of Constructivism:
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course VIS 84 taught by Professor Mangolte during the Fall '07 term at UCSD.

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Soviet Montage - Soviet Cinema In the 1920s The Hardships...

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