AfricanAmericanhistorypaper2 - Green Michael Politics and America in crisis the coming of the Civil War Santa Barbara Praeger 2010 Rawley James Race

AfricanAmericanhistorypaper2 - Green Michael Politics and...

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Green, Michael. Politics and America in crisis: the coming of the Civil War . Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2010. Rawley, James. Race & politics; "bleeding Kansas" and the coming of the Civil War . Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1969. Kornblith, Gary John. Slavery and sectional strife in the early American republic, 1776-1821 . Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2010. Allen, Austin. Origins of the Dred Scott case: Jacksonian jurisprudence and the Supreme Court, 1837- 1857 . Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press, Ratner, Lorman. Fanatics and fire-eaters: newspapers and the coming of the Civil War . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2003. Zeitz, Joshua. "The Missouri Compromise Reconsidered: Antislavery Rhetoric and the Emergence of the Free Labor Synthesis." Journal of the Early Republic Vol. 20, No. 3 (2000): 447-485.
Castel, Albert . "Civil War Kansas and the Negro." The Journal of Negro History Vol. 51, No. 2 (1966): 125-138. Sioussat, St. George. "Tennessee, the Compromise of 1850, and the Nashville Convention." The Mississippi Valley Historical Review Vol. 2 (1915): 313-347. Pierson, Michael. "All Southern Society Is Assailed by the Foulest Charges": Charles Sumner's "The Crime against Kansas" and the Escalation of Republican Anti-Slavery Rhetoric." The New England Quarterly Vol. 68, No. 4 (1995): 531-557. Cohn, Morris. "The Dred Scott Case in the Light of Later Events." The Virginia Law Register Vol. 18 No. 6 (1912): 401-409.
1803-Lousiana Purchase ...... 1807-Jefferson pressures congress to outlaw international slave trade ..... 1820-Missouri Compromise .... 1831-Nat Turner ........ 1847-pop sov ..... Compromise of 1850 ..... 1855-Bleeding Kansas ......... 1856-Preston Brooks of South Carolina beats Charles Sumner ..... 1857-Dred Scott ...... 1860 Lincoln wins election ....... South Carolina, was the first state to secede from the Union, on December 20, 1860. followed by: Mississippi on January 9, 1861 Florida on January 10, 1861 Alabama on January 11, 1861 Georgia on January 19, 1861 Louisiana on January 26, 1861 Texas on February 1, 1861 Virginia on April 17, 1861 Arkansas on May 6,1861 North Carolina on May 20, 1861 Tennessee on June 11, 1861
America in the early 1800s is a nation divided by the debate over slavery. The proponents of slavery insist that it is an inseparable and indispensable aspect of the American economy. They argue that slavery is good for the African, that it civilizes them. Opponents of slavery decry it as a moral abomination. To them the very existence of slavery anywhere within the borders of the United States is unforgivable. In the year 1800 there existed eight free states and nine slave states. This delicate balance between slave and free states is far from amiable, and the two sides are constantly lobbying, legislating, and jockeying for any advantage that could swing power in their favor. In 1803, amidst this tumultuous backdrop, Thomas Jefferson would purchase the Louisiana territory from France and set in motion a chain of events that would lead the America on the path to civil war.

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