Differentiated Unit Plan Accommodation Plan Jasmine Price.docx

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 17 pages.

ACCOMMODATION PLAN 1 Differentiated Unit Plan: Accommodation Plan Jasmine Price EDSP 524 December 13, 2020
ACCOMMODATION PLAN 2 Accommodation 1 - Seating Chart Criteria: Learning Environment Provide a Graphic of the Seating Chart: Discuss why this seating chart is an accommodation for the class you described. I do not have a lot space in my classroom, so I seated my students four-five to a table. Most of my students have a different type of disabilities, I wanted to make sure everyone has enough space to more around in the room. There is extra seating in the classroom for students who have behavior problems, and they need Library Cubies Kate Rachel Amir Jack Computer Station Teacher’s desk Co-teacher desk Writing station Mya Sean Victoria Nicole Eli Hannah Amelia Missy Darren Jamie Amy Kyle Eric Matthew Tyler Bryan Linda Sarah
ACCOMMODATION PLAN 3 a moment to themselves to calm down. Each teacher has a desk so if a student needs extra help, they can ask for assistance. In my classroom they are a lot of collaboration amongst the students after working on assignments. CEC Standard Addressed by Accommodation 1 CEC 2.1: Beginning special education professionals, through collaboration with general educators and other colleagues, create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage individuals with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions. Accommodation 2 – Rewritten Text Criteria: Language Development Focus Student: Unit Plan Link: Unit: ☒ Literacy Math Day: 1 2 3 4 5 Rewrite a section of a text (textbook or trade book) related to your DUP unit theme at a lower reading level for students who are struggling with reading/language. The rewritten text must be at least one grade level lower than the original text. Original Text: The book we will be reading from is “The Voyage of the Frog”. In the first chapter “David stopped at the locked gate, felt in his hands the weight of the small box which he could not stand to see yet, looked down on the sailboat, and tried not to cry. She was twenty-two feet long, with two-foot wooden bowsprit sticking from her nose, a stainless steel pulpit above it. Her mast and boom were made of wood, kept in good shape and varnished to a high sheen. And she had stainless steel lifelines all around and a small cabin in the middle with two plastic portholes on each side. She was old, designed by a man named Schock and made in the mid-sixties, so old her fiberglass hull had lost its shine and had a faintly sanded, opaque look to it, although the original color-a robin’s-egg blue-still shone in the California sun. She had been made before they fully understood fiberglass and learned they could make it thin, so her hull was a full half inch thick, and somehow it made her look stout-tough and short and low and punchy and stout. Across her stern was a wooden plaque and on it was hand carved FROG. David ran his hand over his face. The Frog, he thought-and she’s mine. I’m fourteen years old and I’ve got my own sailboat, my own

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture