Poetry Midterm - Cody Grim Dr Kurowski LIT343 25 March 2013 Short Answer 1 Poetry is not life but rather artificea re-creation of what life is It deals

Poetry Midterm - Cody Grim Dr Kurowski LIT343 25 March 2013...

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Cody GrimDr. KurowskiLIT34325 March 2013Short Answer1.Poetry is not life, but rather artifice—a re-creation of what life is. It deals in private and public moments, from such phases as birth and death to moments like commemorating a war victory or celebrating a holiday. The major concerns of poetry are, in essence, the major questions of humanity: “What piece of life…is it concerned with? and Where and when is this life being lived?” (Vendler 3). Ultimately, the goal of poetry is to produce pleasure, to evoke emotion, to reach readers.2.In regards to patterning, William Carlos William stated that a poem is “a machine made out of words.” Patterns can be constructed in a number of ways, and recognition of these patterns adds to the reader experience. For example, an author can employ word choice, or semantic, patterns. Other options include linguistic patterns, spatial patterns, serial patterns, syntactic patterns, grammatical patterns, psychological patterns, and time patterns. Even the phonetics of a poem, or its sounds, can maintain a pattern.3.Pleasure from poetry can occur because of many reasons, like sensory appeal, a narcissistic element, relaxation, or even problem-solving. In “My Papa’s Waltz,” one of the first pleasing elements is the rhythm of the poem. A waltz typically uses a three-count system of steps, and the poem’s lines are in beats of 6 (or 7), replicating that “waltz-like” feel. The smoothness of a waltz could contribute to relaxation, and the counting of the beats could be attributed to problem-solving.
4.The art of losing isn’t hard to master;so many things seem filled with the intentto be lost that their loss is no disasterLose something every day. Accept the flusterof lost door keys, the hour badly spent.The art of losing isn’t hard to master.Then practice losing farther, losing faster:places, and names, and where it was you meantto travel. None of these will bring disaster.I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, ornext-to-last, of three loved houses went.The art of losing isn’t hard to master.I lost two cities, lovely ones. And vaster,some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent,I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gestureI love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evidentthe art of losing’s not too hard to masterthough it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.
5.Helen Vendler sets up a series of steps in order to most effectively read, explore, and understand a poem. She identifies thirteen areas in which a poem has the potential for utilizing as a means of generating depth. Vendler begins with the meaning of a poem, or a basic understanding achieved through paraphrasing. Then comes antecedent scenario, or a poem’s “backstory.” Following that is division into structural parts, then the climax (or “high point of the poem”), and then its other parts. Next is finding the “skeleton” and whatever games are played with the “skeleton.” Language, tone, and agency/speech acts are next. Vendler then

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