L4 Intro to Pub Policy continue Spring 2008

L4 Intro to Pub Policy continue Spring 2008 - Some issues...

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Some issues already taken! B1 Euthanasia D3 Tuition aid based on merit G1 Illicit drugs, alcohol, tobacco H1 National photo ID card I1 U.S. world superpower role J1 Mandatory second language
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Introduction to Public Policy Lecture 4 Continued January 18, 2008 Pol 1101
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What is Public Policy? Public policy is an intentional course of action followed by government in dealing with some problem or matter of concern. Public policies are government policies based on law, and backed by sanctions - either rewards or punishments. Examples include Acts of Congress, executive orders, and judicial decisions. Individuals, groups and even government agencies that do not comply with policies can be penalized through fines, loss of benefits, even jail. Policies develop over time. More than a legislative decision to enact a law or a presidential decision to issue an executive order – the level of enforcement is also key. Implementation involves providing incentives or disincentives for certain behaviors
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Six Theories or Models 1. INSTITUTIONAL/BUREAUCRATIC MODEL 2. ELITE-MASS MODEL 3. INTEREST GROUP/EQUILIBRIUM MODEL 4. PLURALIST MODEL 5. SYSTEMS MODEL 6. STAGES MODEL
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1. INSTITUTIONAL/BUREAUCRATIC MODEL Concentrates on the traditional organization of government. Describes the duties and arrangements of bureaus and departments. Considers constitutional provisions, administrative and common law, and judicial decisions. Tends to focus on formal arrangements
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2. ELITE-MASS MODEL Unequal distribution of power in society is the norm All important decisions in society are made by the “chosen few”, who govern a largely passive mass Policy flows downward from the elite to the mass, who simply respond to the desires of the elite Elites share values that differentiate them from the mass. The prevailing public policies reflect elite values, which generally preserve the status quo Elites have higher income, more education, and higher status Public policy reflects elite values and preferences, and public officials and administrators merely carry out policies decided on by the elite
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3. INTEREST GROUP/EQUILIBRIUM MODEL Interest groups – not elites or bureaucrats – control the governmental process. Public policy results from a system of forces and
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course POL 1101 taught by Professor White during the Spring '07 term at Georgia Tech.

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L4 Intro to Pub Policy continue Spring 2008 - Some issues...

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