L4 Intro to Pub Policy Spring 2008

L4 Intro to Pub Policy Spring 2008 - Introduction to Public...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Public Policy Lecture 4 January 16, 2008 Pol 1101
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Public Policy What is Public Policy? Read Kraft and Furlong Chapter 1 Public policy – a social science Social science – the belief (or hope) that by discerning general laws of social processes we will better understand our social environment
Image of page 2
What is the state? It is a concept, an idea. It refers to the source of all government authority In reality: a complex arrangement of institutions and processes that have authority and legitimacy Key building block is legitimacy – hence the importance of popular consent
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Legitimacy and Governance Two main questions Legitimacy - the sources of authority, the right of a government to rule and the duty of citizens to obey. But w hat happens when a government loses legitimacy? The war in Iraq? Governance - the ability of a state regime to execute public policies, to achieve efficient and coordinated public administration. But what happens when a government cannot execute public policy? Immigration? Health care?
Image of page 4
What is Public Policy? Public policy is an intentional course of action followed by government in dealing with some problem or matter of concern. Public policies are government policies based on law, and backed by sanctions - either rewards or punishments. Examples include Acts of Congress, executive orders, and judicial decisions. Individuals, groups and even government agencies that do not comply with policies can be penalized through fines, loss of benefits, even jail. Policies develop over time. More than a legislative decision to enact a law or a presidential decision to issue an executive order – the level of enforcement is also key. Implementation involves providing incentives or disincentives for certain behaviors
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Six Theories or Models 1. INSTITUTIONAL/BUREAUCRATIC MODEL 2. ELITE-MASS MODEL 3. INTEREST GROUP/EQUILIBRIUM MODEL 4. PLURALIST MODEL 5. SYSTEMS MODEL 6. STAGES MODEL
Image of page 6
1. INSTITUTIONAL/BUREAUCRATIC MODEL Concentrates on the traditional organization of government. Describes the duties and arrangements of bureaus and departments. Considers constitutional provisions, administrative and common law, and judicial decisions. Tends to focus on formal arrangements
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. INSTITUTIONAL/BUREAUCRATIC MODEL (continued) Bureaucratic theory argues that all institutions, governmental and non-governmental, have fallen under the control of a large and ever- growing bureaucracy that carries out policy on a day-to-day basis using standardized procedures. The growing complexity of modern organizations has empowered bureaucrats, who gain dominance as a consequence of their expertise and competence. Eventually power is wrested from others, especially elected officials.
Image of page 8
2. ELITE-MASS MODEL Unequal distribution of power in society is the norm All important decisions in society are made by the “chosen few”, who govern a largely passive mass Policy flows downward from the elite to the mass, who
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern