L6 Congress - Congress Lecture 6 Pol 1101 The Powers of...

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Congress Lecture 6 January 28, 2007 Pol 1101
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The Powers of Congress Lay and collect taxes and duties Borrow money Regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the states Establish rule for naturalization and bankrupt Establish the post office, coin money, set its value, fix weights and measures, punish counterfeiting Issue patents and copyrights Define and punish crimes on the high seas, including piracy, and crimes against the laws of nations Create courts below the Supreme Court
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The Powers of Congress (continued) Declare war Raise and support an army and navy Provide for a militia (reserving to the states the right to appoint militia officers and to train the militia) Exercise legislative powers over the seat of government (the District of Columbia) and over places purchased to be federal facilities “Make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States” ( Article 1, section 8, Constitution)
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The Powers of Congress (continued) The most important power – the authority to make laws Shared by both houses No bill (= proposed law) can become law without the consent of both houses As interpreted by the Supreme Court, the necessary and proper clause has allowed Congress to increase the scope of its authority, often at the expense of the states and into areas not envisioned by the framers NB: Presidents issue proclamations and executive orders with the force of law Bureaucrats issue quasi-legislative rules Supreme Court renders opinions, which generate principles that also have the force of law
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Constitutional Differences House Senate Initiates all revenue bills Offers advice and consent on many presidential appointments Initiates impeachment Tries impeached officials Passes articles of impeachment Approves treaties Two-year terms Six-year terms (one third up for re-election every two years) 435 members 100 members (by population) (two from each state) http://www.house.gov/house/MemStateSearch.shtml http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Current_United_States_Senators
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Differences in Operation House Senate * More centralized, more * Less centralized, less formal formal, stronger leadership weaker leadership * Rules Committee: fairly
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L6 Congress - Congress Lecture 6 Pol 1101 The Powers of...

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