Vanessa Munoz-Marin - Imperialism Case Study - China.pdf -...

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Why were imperialist nations interested in China? Objectives: Describe the motivations behind imperialism in China. Introduction Directions: In the space below, brainstorm what you remember about China and its history. What do you know about China and its history? What was the last thing you remember studying about China? I remember learning about three chinese philosophies (confucianism, daoism, and legalism)
China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Directions: Examine the timeline and text below then answer the questions that follow. In the 16th century, the Chinese economy was still the most sophisticated and productive in the world, and the Chinese probably enjoyed a higher standard of living than any other people on earth. The Qing (Ch'ing) Dynasty (1644-1912), founded by a group of people called the Manchus from northern China, continued this splendor. Eighteenth century Chinese scholars referred to this period as "unparalleled in history," when all aspects of culture flourished. China was a prosperous state with abundant natural resources, a huge but basically contented population, and a royal house of great prestige at home and abroad. By the late 18th century, however, the strong Chinese state started to struggle, particularly because of its expanding population. Having remained at 100 million people through much of history, under the peaceful Qing (Ch'ing), the population doubled from 150 million in 1650 to 300 million by 1800, and reached 450 million by the late nineteenth century (the population of the United States in 2014 was 318.9 million). By then, there was no longer any land in China's southern and central provinces available for migration: the introduction of New World (American) crops through trade - especially sweet potatoes, peanuts, and tobacco, which required different growing conditions than rice and wheat - had already claimed previously unusable land. So, there was a food and land shortage in China. To compound these problems, the state's political control was diminishing. The size of the bureaucracy remained the same while the population grew. By the 19th century, district magistrates at the lowest level of the Chinese bureaucracy were responsible for the welfare, control, and taxation of an average of 250,000 people, a number that was difficult to serve. The government’s ability to keep up important projects like the Grand Canal, which made it possible to move goods between the north and south, operating decreased. With the government stretched so thin, it it struggled to respond to crises like the famines that hit the country between 1876 and 1879 and claimed the lives of 9.5 million people. Source: Adapted from 1. Describe China during the Qing Dynasty before the late 1700s. 2. Identify three effects of the population increase in China during the Qing Dynasty.

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