B1510F07_L13_PopEcol

B1510F07_L13_PopEcol - Georgia Tech School of Biology...

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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 altruism: kin selection and reciprocity What should happen to a gene that coded for an individual to help others at a cost to itself? 1. that gene will increase in frequency 2. that gene will decrease in frequency
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 altruism: kin selection and reciprocity So, how can a gene which imposes a cost increase in frequency? well, lots of characters impose costs (the deep bills of the medium ground finch are costly to grow and maintain)… all that is necessary is for the benefit associated with a character to outweigh the cost but, what if individual A pays the cost and ind. B gets payoff?
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 altruism: kin selection and reciprocity Examples of apparently altruistic behaviors abound: -helping at-the-nest and brood parasitism -eusociality in insects (and naked mole rats) -food sharing in vampire bats -predator inspection in fishes but are such behaviors really altruistic, or is something else going on?
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 helping at the nest – kin selection fairy wrens Hamilton’s rule: br > c
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 brood parasitism
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 eusocial insects As a result of haplodiploid inheritance in the Hymenoptera (wasps, ants,bees), sisters are more closely related to each other than they are to their own offspring! Helping the queen make sisters gives a greater genetic payoff than reproducing yourself…
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Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2007 Population Ecology Life history. Specialized stages and strategies. Reproductive output and costs. Population structure Population dynamics. Geometric and exponential growth. Carrying capacity, logistic equation.
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B1510F07_L13_PopEcol - Georgia Tech School of Biology...

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