Human Resources Lecture

Human Resources Lecture - Managing Human Resources 09- 1...

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09- 09- 1 Managing Human Resources
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2 Confidential - for classroom use only Human Resources Management Human resources management is the comprehensive set of organizational and managerial activities concerned with attracting, developing and maintaining a qualified and effective workforce The goals of HR management include 1. determining needs 2. finding workers 3. developing workers 4. keeping workers
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3 Confidential - for classroom use only Pre-Capitalist Industrial Organization Category A : The tiny family workshops, countless in number and grouped in clusters’, each with a master-tradesman, two or three journeymen and one or two apprentices, a family in itself. Category B : workshops which were scattered, but connected to each other. The coordinator, or go-between, or director of the work was the merchant entrepreneur who advanced the raw material, saw that went from spinner to weaver, to fuller, to dyer, to shearer, who took care of he finishing processes and the payment of wages, and at the end of the day pocketed the profits from sales at home or abroad. This dispersed manufacture was established as early as the Middle Ages, not only for textiles but also from very early on for cutlery, nail-making and ironworking. The pattern in every case was a sequence of manufacturing operations, culminating in the appearance of the finished product and its marketing. Category C : ‘concentrated manufacture’, which appeared later, at different dates depending on the industry and the country. The water-operated forges of the fourteenth century were an early example of concentrated manufacture: several operations were brought together in one spot. Their characteristic feature was the bringing together under one roof, usually in a large building, of the labour force; this made possible supervision of the work, an advanced division of labour – in short increased productivity and an improvement in the quality of products. Category D: factories equipped with machinery, using the additional energy sources of running water and steam. Examples are the naval yards of Saardam near Amsterdam in the seventeenth century, with their mechanical saws, their cranes, their mast-erecting machines; and so many little ‘factories’ using hydraulic wheels: paper-mills, fulling mills, saw-mills or the sword-works in Vienne in the Dauphine, where the grindstones and bellows were mechanically operated. Fernand Braudel, The Wheels of Commerce (University of California Press: 1992).
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4 Confidential - for classroom use only The Growth of Employment 1800 2000 Work for somebody else 20% 90% Employed by organizations with > 500 people 0% 50% Charles Perrow, Organizing America, 2002, p.1.
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5 Confidential - for classroom use only The Domestic System The domestic system or putting-out system was a popular system of production in Europe. It differed from the handicraft system of home production in that the workers neither bought materials nor sold products. It existed as early as the 1400s but was most prominent in the 17
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BUSINESS 105 taught by Professor Aronhime during the Fall '08 term at Johns Hopkins.

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Human Resources Lecture - Managing Human Resources 09- 1...

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