stemfocus_worksheet.pdf - Stem Focus Worksheet T e...

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Unformatted text preview: Stem Focus Worksheet T e Instructions: Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers. The following excerpt is from a play first published in 1933. Believing himself jilted by his first love, Muriel, RICHARD last night tried curing his wounds by staying out late and coming home to a worried family. Forbidden to leave the house, he is feeling embarrassed, depressed, and melodramatically pessimistic about life when his sister, MILDRED, enters. (1) MILDRED: Hello! Are you allowed up? (2) RICHARD: Of course, I’m allowed up. (3) MILDRED: [comes and sits in her father’s chair at right, front, of table] How did Pa punish you? (4) RICHARD: He didn’t. He went back to the office without seeing me. (5) MILDRED: Well, you’ll catch it later. [then rebukingly] And you ought to. If you’d ever seen how awful you looked last night! mildred believes that richard deserves punishment (6) RICHARD: Ah, forget it, can’t you? (7) MILDRED: Well, are you ever going to do it again, that’s what I want to know. (8) RICHARD: What’s that to you? (9) MILDRED: [with suppressed excitement] Well, if you don’t solemnly swear you won’t—then I won’t give you something I’ve got for you. (10) RICHARD: Don’t try to kid me. You haven’t got anything. (11) MILDRED: I have, too. (12) RICHARD: What? (13) MILDRED: Wouldn’t you like to know! I’ll give you three guesses. (14) RICHARD: [with disdainful dignity] Don’t bother me. I’m in no mood to play riddles with kids! (15) MILDRED: Oh, well, if you’re going to get snippy! Anyway, you haven’t promised yet. (16) RICHARD: [a prey to keen curiosity now] I promise. What is it? (17) MILDRED: What would you like best in the world? (18) RICHARD: I don’t know. What? (19) MILDRED: And you pretend to be in love! If I told Muriel that! (20) RICHARD: [breathlessly] Is it—from her? “breathlessly” indicates that richard most likely still has feeling for muriel (21) MILDRED: [laughing] Well, I guess it’s a shame to keep you guessing. Yes. It is from her. I was walking past her place just now when I saw her waving from their parlor window, and I went up and she said give this to Dick, and she didn’t have a chance to say anything else because her mother called her and said she wasn’t allowed to have company. So I took it—and here it is. [She gives him a letter folded many times into a tiny square. RICHARD opens it with a trembling eagerness and reads. MILDRED watches him curiously—then sighs affectedly.] Gee, it must be nice to be in love like you are—all with one person. (22) RICHARD: [his eyes shining with joy] Gee, Mid, do you know what she says —that she didn’t mean a word in that other letter. Her old man made her write it. And she loves me and only me and always will, no matter how they punish her! (23) MILDRED: My! I’d never think she had that much spunk. (24) RICHARD: Huh! You don’t know her! Think I could fall in love with a girl that was afraid to say her soul’s her own? I should say not! [then more gleefully still] And she’s going to try and sneak out and meet me tonight. She says she thinks she can do it. [then suddenly feeling this enthusiasm before MILDRED is entirely the wrong note for a cynical pessimist—with an affected bitter laugh] Ha! I knew darned well she couldn’t hold out—that she’d ask to see me again. [He misquotes cynically] “Women never know when the curtain has fallen. They always want another act.”* (25) MILDRED: Is that so, Smarty? (26) RICHARD: [as if he were weighing the matter] I don’t know whether I’ll consent to keep this date or not. (27) MILDRED: Well, I know! You’re not allowed out, you silly! So you can’t! (28) RICHARD: [dropping all pretense—defiantly] Can’t I, though! You wait and see if I can’t! I’ll see her tonight if it’s the last thing I ever do! I don’t care how I’m punished after! (29) MILDRED: [admiringly] Goodness! I never thought you had such nerve! as playful as mildred is being, she still admires richard. Copyright © 1933 by Eugene O’Neill Copyright © renewed 1960 by Carlotta Monterey O’Neill. Reprinted by permission CollegeBoard ™ * The quote is from playwright Oscar Wilde. 1. Together with the stage directions, Mildred’s words in line 9 (“Well . . . for you”) and line 21 (“Well …. guessing”) suggest that she What is the focus of this question? The focus of this question is to find Mildred’s mood and how to text reveals changes in mood, or lack thereof. 2. What does the shifting tone of Richard’s dialogue in line 24 (“Huh . . . act”) reveal about his character? What is the focus of this question? The focus of this question is to find Richard’s mood and changes in mood. 3. Mildred’s account in line 21 (“Well . . . here it is”) of her interaction with Muriel most clearly serves to What is the focus of this question? The focus is to find the significance of the interaction in the text 4. Richard’s reaction to the letter Mildred gives him suggests that the “other letter” (line 22) has been an obstacle to him because he was What is the focus of this question? The focus here would be to find the significance of the previous letter and to possibly compare Richard’s reactions to both. 5. Which of the following best describes a secondary conflict that remains unresolved at the end of the passage? What is the focus of this question? The focus would be the underlying conflict or certain internal struggles within the characters. It is also exploring the conclusion and what the reader is left with. 6. Details presented in the passage suggest that the setting of Richard and Mildred’s conversation is What is the focus of this question? The focus is to find the setting and its significance to the story and conflict. 7. What lines from the passage would best support a reader’s claim that teenage rebellion is a central theme in the passage? What is the focus of this question? The focus is the central theme and evidence from the text which support it. "An Arundel Tomb" from THE COMPLETE POEMS OF PHILIP LARKIN by Philip Larkin, edited by Archie Burnett. Copyright © 2012 by the Estate of Philip Larkin. Reprinted by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux." An Arundel Tomb" from THE COMPLETE POEMS OF PHILIP LARKIN by Philip Larkin, edited by Archie Burnett. Reprinted by permission of Faber and Faber Ltd. 1 a glove made of armor 2 coils 3 coat of arms 8. Which piece of textual evidence from the final stanza (lines 37–42) would best support an interpretation of the poem as implying that we can never know anything with certainty? What is the focus of this question? The focus is the differing interpretations of the text and evidence from the text suggesting each implication. 9. In lines 5–6 (“And that . . . feet”), the speaker’s reference to the “dogs” has which effect on the development of the poem? What is the focus of this question? The focus would be author’s tone and diction, and the effect his choices have on the development of the poem. 10. The metaphor implied in lines 29–31 (“And up . . . identity”) is best interpreted as assigning the “endless altered people” the qualities of a What is the focus of this question? The focus is the metaphors and their meaning and effect on the text. 11. In lines 9–12 (“It meets . . . hand”), the representation of the hands functions primarily as What is the focus of this question? The focus is the symbolism of hands and its function in the story. 12. Lines 32–42 (“Now, helpless . . . love”) suggest which of the following about the relationship between “Time” and the couple depicted on the tomb? What is the focus of this question? The focus of this question is the relationships in the text and how they are developed throughout the passage. 13. In context, the symbolism of the phrase “unarmorial age” (line 33) suggests that the poem’s current setting is an age in which What is the focus of this question? The focus of this question is to explore the setting and its relationships to the symbolism in the text. 14. In the context of the second stanza, the “sharp tender shock” (line 11) suggests that the What is the focus of this question? The focus of this question is the diction and its effect on the meaning in passage. 15. In context, the expression “To look, not read” (line 25) affects the pacing of the poem by implying a shift in time that has which effect? What is the focus of this question? The focus is the expression and the effect it has on the pacing of the poem, as well as the meaning it adds to the shift in time. ...
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