CLAS_267_lect_3_class_notes_2013-1

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Harrison/CLAS 267 Lect 3 (2013) - George W. Mallory Harrison Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece (CLAS 267) CLASS OUTLINE Lecture 3: Early Bronze Age Greece Assigned readings: Preziosi and Hitchcock 44 - 61 IMAGE 1: Opening Image IMAGE 2: Final Neolithic Activity + wattle and daub house Sites generally small; few larger ones exist These stand out as oddities – much wealthier and important late Neolithic period not characterized by much building and settlement - settlements tend to be small Houses have few rooms with shared walls Not real spatial organization; added to as necessary except for larger sites like Dimini, Late Neolithic houses small shared walls o few stand alone structures: these tend to be rectangular MAINLAND/PELOPONNESE IMAGE 3: Early Bronze Age Activity + House of the Tiles EH I, EC I, and EM I are show little advance in architecture; c. 3100 BCE – c. 2900 BCE almost as if need to absorb new metal technology from beginning of EH II, EC II, and EM II there is appearance of more complex structures; c. 2900 BCE - c. 2400 BCE o rectangular plan continues, but with multiple rooms axial planning is evident EH II, EC II, EM II sees the first organized settlements widespread in Greece Two main types of houses plan o Megaron-type arrangement [‘chief’s house’, Dimini] neolithic continuity into Bronze Age dominant in EH II more than in EC II or EM II 1
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Harrison/CLAS 267 Lect 3 (2013) - o Corridor House series of corridors seems to imply a (1) plan and (2) standard measurement IMAGE 4: LEMMA MAINLAND AND PEOLOPNNESE IMAGE 5: LandSat photo of Argolid IMAGE 6: Early Helladic period – major sites IMAGE 7: Early Helladic I -- significant shifts IMAGE 8: Early Helladic II – significant shifts IMAGE 9: late Early Helladic II – significant shifts IMAGE 10: Lerna, overall photo of site settled in EH II prior Neolithic village on site with 20 levels of activity long period of lack of habitation after Paleolithic and EH II settlement c. 3000 BCE – another movement of populations – the beginning of the Bronze Age Again, probably from Anatolia important changes can be observed: Cultivation of grapes Cultivation of olives Cultivation of cereals Widespread use of metal – o copper o bronze (alloy of copper and tin) Tools/weapons can now be more durable, stronger, longer-lasting display of wealth – source of competition o jewelry out of metals not stone and bone first evidence of gold and silver IMAGE 11: drawing of ancient coastline coast line change great from antiquity PhD thesis Thea Smith; UCinti Evidence of cores was that the coastline was marshy in early Bronze Age o perhaps helps make sense of myth of Herakles and hydra o only tiny portion of site excavated so much more potentially can be learned o evidence that a central deposition mound had grown during periods of abandonment o EH II settler tidied up and leveled off the central mound and built houses on it o Thick stone foundations are typical surmounted by mud brick 2
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