Lab Report 3 - Word Relatedness 1 Running head WORD...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Word Relatedness 1 Running head: WORD RELATEDNESS Effect of Word Relatedness on Reaction Time to Word Identification name University of Southern California
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Word Relatedness 2 Abstract Participants were presented with a series of a pair of letter strings, which were either related, not related, or were a word paired with a nonword. They were asked to report whether the second string of letters was a word or a nonword. The reaction time to correctly identify the second letter string was quicker if the two words were semantically associated with each other. This supports the hypothesis that response time to the second word should be faster if the first word is associated with it, since mental lexicon is organized by semantic meaning.
Image of page 2
Word Relatedness 3 Effect of Word Relatedness on Reaction Time to Word Identification Most people are familiar with the concept of a dictionary; a collection of words arranged alphabetically, containing information about each word’s meaning and pronunciation, among other information. Human minds have a mechanism that is similar to a dictionary, called a lexicon, which stores information about words and other language components. This “mental dictionary” would not be very useful to us if it were arranged alphabetically. When we need to know which word to say, the appropriate word does not depend on what its first letters are, but rather on the meaning of the word and its relationship to other words. Words in our lexicons that are related to each other are close together, and create semantic networks that increase the efficiency of our lexicons. The increased efficiency is due to neural activity in the lexicon called spreading activation, defined by Goldstein as “activity that spreads out along any link in a network that is connected to an activated node” (2005). In the case of the lexicon, the nodes are words, and when a word is activated neural activity spreads to the words around it that are semantically related to it.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern