Powerpoint 1--------4-3-08

Powerpoint 1--------4-3-08 - The Unusual Properties of H2O...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Unusual Properties of H 2 O *Energy associated with the interconversion   of the solid and liquid phase. H 2 O (s)     H 2 O (l) ice water (at 0 o C!! ) H fus  = 5.96 kJ/mole  (or 331 J/g) Water has an unusually large heat of fusion*:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Unusual Properties of H 2 O H 2 O (l)     H 2 O (g) water steam (at 100 o C!! ) H fus  = 40.5 kJ/mole  (or 2250 J/g) …also an unusually high heat of vaporization*:  *Energy associated with the interconversion   of the gas and liquid phase.
Background image of page 2
Molecular Mass (amu) Boiling Point,  o C -100 -50 50 0 - 100 100 80 60 40 20 120 140 TeH 2 H 2 O SH 2 SeH 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In the liquid phase, molecules are closely packed.
Background image of page 4
In the gas phase, they are much further apart.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What features of the molecular structure of H 2 0 produce these unusual properties?   Liquid Phase Gas Phase
Background image of page 6
What features of the molecular structure of H 2 0 produce these unusual properties?   Liquid Phase Gas Phase
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The  electronegativity  of an element describes the relative strength with which it draws electrons towards itself in a bond.
Background image of page 8
H H Because both atoms have the same electronegativity in H 2 , the electrons are as close to one nucleus as the other:  This bond is described as  non polar covalent because the electrons are shared equally.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
H-H O Non polar Covalent EN<0.5 EN= EN(H) – EN(H) =2.1 – 2.1 =0 H H EN = EN(O) – EN(H)  = 3.5  -  2.1 = 1.4  Polar Covalent 0.5< EN<2.0
Background image of page 10
H H O O H H O H H These electrons are found closer to oxygen than to  hydrogen.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
O H H EN = EN(O) – EN(H)  = 3.5  -  2.1 = 1.4 Li-F EN = EN(F) – EN(Li)  = 4.0 – 1.0 = 3.0  Polar Covalent 0.5< EN<2.0 Ionic EN>2.0
Background image of page 12
Color coding on the charge density model Indicates areas of high electron density ( red ) And low electron density ( violet ).
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How does this idea help us explain the  strange properties of water?
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CHEM 102 taught by Professor Zona during the Spring '08 term at Illinois State.

Page1 / 42

Powerpoint 1--------4-3-08 - The Unusual Properties of H2O...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online