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1 - Lecture 33 Notes

1 - Lecture 33 Notes - Lecture 33 Chordata I Introduc*on to...

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Lecture 33. Chordata I Introduc*on to Chordates Students should be able to : •Describe the defining features of the Chordates •describe the posi*on and func*on of the notochord •explain how the vertebral column forms in development and how it relates to the notochord •explain how jaws evolved and what evidence supports this idea
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What are chordates? Lancelets, sea squirts, jawless fishes, jawed fishes, and tetrapods (amphibians, rep*les, mammals) Diverse (and oCen dominant) group of animals, both on land and in water.
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Major lineages of metazoans Deuterostome traits radial cleavage blastopore anus enterocoely
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Major lineages of metazoans Deuterostome traits radial cleavage blastopore anus enterocoely
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What are chordates? Deuterostomes with… 1. Notochord 2. Dorsal hollow nerve cord 3. Postanal tail 4. Pharyngeal slits
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What are chordates? Deuterostomes with… 1. Notochord 2. Dorsal hollow nerve cord 3. Postanal tail 4. Pharyngeal slits at least in embryo
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Other important innova*ons arose within chordates including… 1. Internal skeleton with vertebrae 2. Jaws 3. Two pairs of walking limbs
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Chordate features Notochord dorsal suppor*ng rod, semi-­૒rigid yet flexible mesodermal in origin develops in embryo (replaced by vertebrae in most vertebrates) in more ancestral taxa rigidity allowed use of muscles aSached to it for locomo*on notochord
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Chordate features Notochord dorsal suppor*ng rod, semi-­૒rigid yet flexible mesodermal in origin develops in embryo (replaced by vertebrae in most vertebrates) in more ancestral taxa rigidity allowed use of muscles aSached it for locomo*on hSp://bio1151.nicerweb.com/Locked/media/ ch34/34_vertebra_discs.gif hSp://classconnec*on.s3.amazonaws.com/ 729/flashcards/1803729/png/ embryodisc1348356076563.png
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Chordate features Notochord Dorsal hollow nerve cord develops from infolding of ectoderm above the notochord notochord dorsal hollow nerve
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