Chapter 18-The French Revolution - Chapter 18 The French Revolution On crowds stormed the Bastille a prison in Paris This event whose only practical

Chapter 18-The French Revolution - Chapter 18 The French...

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Chapter 18 The French Revolution
French Financial Crisis Parlements – French royal courts dominated by hereditary nobility Made it difficult to tax the wealthy Were abolished by Louis XV and reinstated by Louis XVI Kept vetoing efforts to raise taxes in response to wars Enjoyed positive public opinion because they opposed the monarchy Louis XV’s personal behavior further discredited him w/ public
French Monarchy 1774-1793
copyright Bridgeman–Giraudon/Art Resource, NY
Jacques Necker Royal director-general of finances -1776 Argued that the economy was really not that bad Took out large international loans rather than raising taxes He supported the Am Rev Revealed a large portion of royal costs went to pensions for aristocrats Dismissed from office - 1783
Calonne’s Reform Plan Minister of finance - 1783 Increased public spending to “buy” way out of economic trouble Wanted to introduce a new land tax that all landowners regardless of class would have to pay New local assemblies made up of landowners based on land more than social status would determine any additional taxes Dismissed 1787 Monsieur Déficit”
Deadlock and the Estates General Calonne replaced by Brienne Brienne appealed to the Assembly of the Clergy to pay debts, but was refused Parlements wanted privileges of the early 17 th century returned to them Brienne resigns and replaced by Necker reforms on the horizon
Assembly of Notables Aristocracy refused Calonne’s plan Called for the reappointment of Necker Claimed only the Estates General could consent to new taxes A medieval institution not used since 1614 Called in 1789
The Three Estates Three estates in France First Estate – clergy Second Estate – nobility Third Estate – everyone else including middle class Third Estate warned it would not let the first two estates rule the future of the nation
Challenging the French Political Order This late eighteenth-century cartoon satirizes the French social and political structure as the events and tensions leading up to the outbreak of the French Revolution unfolded. This image embodies the highly radical critique of the French political structure that erupted from about l787 when the nobility and church refused to aid the financial crisis of the monarchy. CORBIS/Bettmann
The Farmer Crushed by Taxes
Debate over Estate Voting

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