Bringing Peace to Chechnya FINAL

Bringing Peace to Chechnya FINAL - Jaworski1 Bringing Peace...

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Jaworski1 Bringing Peace to Chechnya Zachary D. Jaworski Undergraduate Student at the John C. Whitehead School of International  Relations and Diplomacy
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Jaworski2 Since the end of the Cold War, Chechnya has remained in a constant state of peacelessness because of relentless bloodshed caused by conflict with Russia. After the fall of the USSR, Chechnya, under General Dudayev, tried to become an independent country, however they were unable to persuade any other countries to recognize them as a legitimate nation. In December 1994, Russia under President Boris Yeltsin launched a full-scale invasion in order to prevent Chechnya from becoming an independent nation. A cease-fire agreement was finally signed in 1996, however both sides continued to fight and by mid-1996 almost 40,000 had been killed, including a large number of civilians (Anatol, pg. 43). The constant conflict in the region forced hundreds of thousands to seek refuge in Russia. Although Russian and Chechen leaders have, on several occasions, agreed to peace settlements, fighting has continued to tear the region apart. In 1999, the second Chechen war broke out when Islamic guerrillas began to occupy several villages, claiming the territory for a separate Islamic territory (Kramer, pg. 209). Chechnya is now a region devastated by the continuity of conflict, and the never-ending bloodshed. The purpose of the research at hand is to recognize and analyze all aspects of peacelessness in a nation that has never known tranquility. This will be accomplished by first identifying all aspects of violence within the region, including both direct and structural conflicts. Secondly, it is imperative that we recognize the values that are at stake in the region. Finally, it is essential to imagine what peace would be perceived as in Chechnya, and what tools will be needed to finally bring the long-awaited harmony to the region. Over the years, Chechnya has faced several factors of violence, both direct and structural. One severe problem preventing peace in the region is the on-going civil war
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Jaworski3 and strife. The war between Russian soldiers deployed in the region and Chechen rebel fighters has been continuing now for nearly twenty years. The obvious instability of economy and the prevalence of violence has prompted hundreds of thousands to seek refuge in the southern regions of Russia. In a recent statistic, nearly 90 percent of Chechen men are without jobs, prompting them to take up arms with the multiple militias in order to make a living (Kramer, Pg. 209). Also, in a 1994 peace treaty, Russia promised to rebuild the Chechen economy, a promise that still has not been fulfilled (Williams, pg. 136). These economic problems only further encourage violence in the region. Guerrilla units within Chechnya resort to kidnapping and staging hostage- takeovers in order to make money (Williams, pg. 144). For several years, Chechnya has been controlled by Muslim and Chechen warlords who manage stability by threatening
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course DIPL ??? taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '07 term at Seton Hall.

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Bringing Peace to Chechnya FINAL - Jaworski1 Bringing Peace...

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