Introductory Nuclear Physics

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PHY431 Lecture 8 1 4/30/2000 11. Gauge Theories All true present-day theories are based on local gauge (or phase) invariance, i.e. the phase of the wave- functions can be varied according to an almost arbitrary space-time dependent function, and the La- grangian L = L ( ψ , µ ) that describes the system keeps the same form under phase (historically named “gauge-”) transformations of the type: (,) ' it tt e t α ψψ →= r rr r (11.1) i.e. if ( r , t ) is a solution, then ( r , t ) is a solution too! Phase transformations of this type are called “local”, because the phase angle is dependent on the local space-time coordinates ( r , t ). Transforma- tions where the phase angle is a constant (i.e. the same for all space-time points) are instead called “global”. The term “gauge” is inherited from early, unsuccessful, attempts by Hermann Weyl to con- struct theories with invariance under local scale (“eich” in German) transformations as a basis for a theory of electromagnetism. Local Gauge Invariance has been proven to be a very powerful and guiding requirement for a theory, and is a necessary condition for renormalizability of the calculations. It is strongly believed that all theories realized in nature are locally gauge invariant theories. You may ask what other local phase transformations exist apart from the one shown in equation (11.1); indeed, one can construct more complicated versions of the phase rotation, e.g. exp{ i σ⋅ b ( x )} which is a two-by-two matrix, as can be seen from the series expansion of the exp function: 23 31 2 11 2 2 33 12 3 () ..., with 2! 3! i bb i b ii ei b b b bi b b σσ σ  ⋅⋅ =+ ⋅+ + + ⋅= + + =  +−  σ b σ b σ b 1 σ b σ b (11.2) with the standard form of the Pauli matrices. Before going any further, we present a quick overview of notations for the kinematics of special relativity. 11.1 Intermezzo: Special Relativity Four-vectors are denoted by x µ , with the greek index =0,1,2,3; a single time-like component 0, fol- lowed by the three space-like components 1,2 and 3: x = ( x 0 , x 1 , x 2 , x 3 ). The space-like indices 1,2, and 3 are habitually represented by lower case roman characters: e.g. x i = x = ( x 1 , x 2 , x 3 ). In (special) relativity a space-time distance (four-length) t 2 x 2 y 2 z 2 is constant and invariant under Lorentz transforma- tions: i.e. t 2 x 2 y 2 z 2 = t 2 x 2 y 2 z 2 , a direct consequence of the constancy of the speed of light for all observers. The space-time fourvector coordinate is denoted by x = ( x 0 , x 1 , x 2 , x 3 ) = ( x 0 , x i ) = ( t , x ) = ( t , x , y , z ). The space-time components mix between themselves by Lorentz transformations from one inertial system to another. A Lorentz transformation from an (unprimed) system to another (primed) system moving at relative velocity β// x with respect to the first, can be expressed in terms of speed β and relativistic fac- tor γ (1 2 ) ½ as: 22 2 00 01 , with det( ) 1 10 µµ νν γβ βγ Λ= Λ = − = (11.3) Note the lower and upper indices: this facilitates the definition of a summation convention of same in- dices:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
PHY431 Lecture 8 2 4/30/2000 3 01 2 3 0 ' xx
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2008 for the course PHY 431 taught by Professor Rijssenbeek during the Spring '01 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Page1 / 7

Lecture 08 - PHY431 Lecture 8 1 11 Gauge Theories All true...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online