BPS Briefing - Children and Young Peoples Mental Health and Wellbeing.pdf - British Psychological Society briefing Children and Young People\u2019s Mental

BPS Briefing - Children and Young Peoples Mental Health and Wellbeing.pdf

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British Psychological Society briefing: Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Psychological Wellbeing This briefing outlines the British Psychological Society’s response to recent analysis and reports regarding the decline of children and young people’s mental h ealth and to the further development of MHSTs in response to this. Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Psychological Wellbeing New statistics from NHS Digital, released last year, show an increase in the prevalence of mental health difficulties in children and young people. This underlines that the current approach and funding model is not working. We need to prioritise prevention and early intervention using psychological approaches that are proven to work with children and their families, peers, schools and communities to address wider social factors. Psychological and social factors should be at the heart of all high level strategic planning in relation to mental health services. Action needs to be taken to address the societal factors that contribute to mental health difficulties, such as poverty and discrimination. Not only is this in the best interests of children and young people, but prevention is cheaper than cure. The Children ’s Commissioner ’s report The State of Children’s Mental Health Services 2020/21 contains an overview of children’s mental health services . These figures reveal just how many of our young people are affected by mental health conditions and how little is spent on their wellbeing. The report highlights areas that have failed to meet the most basic expectations NHS England set for children’s mental health service. Moreover, it asserts that, ‘ CCGs that have consistently deprioritised children’s mental health, ignored the needs of children and failed to meet the expectations of NHS England should face consequences .’ This confirms what psychologists who work with this group have known for years - that the mental health challenges children and young people face are increasing and are escalating rapidly due to the pandemic. Key Statistics (NHS Digital, 2020) Rates of probable mental disorder have increased since 2017. In 2020, one in six (16.0%) children aged 5 to 16 years were identified as having a probable mental disorder, increasing from one in nine (10.8%) in 2017. Children and young people with a probable mental disorder were more likely to say that lockdown had made their life worse (54.1% of 11 to 16 year olds, and 59.0% of 17 to 22 year olds). Hundreds of thousands of children are being left without the help they need. Damage to children and young people’s mental health will last for years and if left untreated , there is a high probability that the issues, which develop from psychological distress now, will be taken into adulthood. T he latest CO-SPACE data

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