KaitlinsNotes - Narrative Design Story Construction Idea...

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Narrative Design 06/12/2007 21:03:00 Story Construction Idea that stories are constructed Someone is making choices Distinguish between Story and Plot STORY All events that are either explicitly presented or implied in the film Rushmore: part of the story is Miss Cross’s husband’s death, but we didn’t  see it happen so it is not part of the plot PLOT Parts of the story that are actually shown in the film Diegesis Everything that is part of the world of the film Diegetic and extra diegetic If a character can hear, touch, smell, experience it, it is diegetic Extradiegetic The character cannot experience it Use of score—the character cannot hear it, it is not part of the character’s  world Title cards Extradiegetic is part of the plot, but not part of the story Structure Three acts
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o 1 st  act Exposition/Introduction Main character has a goal and an obstacle in their way to  achieving that goal o 2 nd  act Problem gets more complex, developed Problem reaches its climax o 3 rd  act Resolution/Denouement Organizational patterns Linear pattern—primary organizational pattern in Hollywood cinema o Causal logic—follows cause and effect o Each scene has a cause and effect relationship o Each event is caused by the event prior o Does not necessarily mean chronological—can jump around in time Episodic structure o Logic of the plot follows the logic of memory o Each scene does not necessarily have a cause/effect relationship o Usually large ensemble films Thematic and contextual  o Primary organizational logic is based around an idea/theme o Most often seen in documentary and experimental filmmaking
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o Theme motivates the way we move around the film Classic elements of narrative Characters o Center of the story o The thing we recognize first and are watching o Protagonist—main character o Antagonist—villain, obstacle; the thing that is standing against the  protagonist in their goal o Round/Flat Round characters are three dimensional, lifelike Jason Schwartzman in Rushmore Usually major characters Flat characters are one dimensional, one dominant trait Bill Murray’s sons in Rushmore Usually minor characters Settings o Can be inscribed with more meaning than just a location o The way that it is shot can show meaning to a place Narration o How the plot chooses to give us information, how much info they do  give us o Point of view of the story o Sunset Blvd—cynical outlook
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o Range How much info they give us How much the audience knows as compared to how much the  characters know
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BUS 215 taught by Professor Mcquiddy during the Spring '08 term at Chapman University .

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KaitlinsNotes - Narrative Design Story Construction Idea...

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