displaox_3.pdf - The Project Gutenberg eBook of Plutarch's...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

2/5/2021The Project Gutenberg eBook of Plutarch's Lives, Vol III. by Aubrey Stewart & George Long.240/310attached himself to Octavianus. There is a letter of Cicero to Matius, with theanswer of Matius (Cicero, Ad Diversos, xi. 27, 28) written after Cæsar's death,which shows him to have been a man of honour and courage, and worthy ofthe name of Cæsar's friend.This letter of Cæsar's is probably a forgery of the anecdote-makers. Davis(note to Oudendorp's Cæsar, ii. 992) has indicated the probable source of thissupposed letter. (Suetonius, Cæsar, c. 37.) The battle was a smart affair ofseveral hours, and was not won without some loss.He was named Dictator for B.C. 47 by the Senate in Rome immediately afterthe battle of Pharsalia: he was at Alexandria when he received this news. Heappointed M. Antonius his Master of the Horse and sent him to Rome. (DionCassius, 42. c. 21-33.)It broke out during his dictatorship. (Suetonius, Cæsar, c. 70; Dion Cassius,42. c. 52.) The story is told very circumstantially by Appianus (Civil Wars, ii.92). The soldiers demanded of Cæsar release from service (missio), and hegranted it to them in a single word, Mitto. The soldiers having got what theyasked for were no longer soldiers, but citizens; and Cæsar in the subsequentpart of the conference properly addressed them as Quirites, just as Ciceroaddresses the Roman people by this name in one of his orations against Rullus.The soldiers at last prevailed on him to restore them to their former condition;and he set out with them for his African war. This affair is alluded to byTacitus. (Annal.ii. 42; Lucanus, v. 357.)P. Cornelius Dolabella, a devoted adherent of Cæsar. His turbulent tribunate isrecorded by Dion Cassius (42. c. 29, &c.). He was consul with M. AntoniusB.C. 44. The name Amantius occurs here again. It is Amintius in some editionsof Plutarch. Kaltwasser observes that nothing is known of Amintius andCorfinius. But Corfinius should be Cornificius; and Amantius should probablybe C. Matius.Cato was not in the battle of Pharsalus. After the battle Cato, Scipio, Afranius,and Labienus went to Corcyra, whence they sailed to Africa to join Juba. (Lifeof Cato, c. 55; Dion Cassius, 42. c. 10; Appianus, Civil Wars, ii. 95, &c.)The history of the African War is contained in one book, and is printed in theeditions with the Gallic War of Cæsar. Cæsar landed at Hadrumetum, becauseUtica was strongly guarded. (Dion Cassius, 42. c. 58.)Comp. the African War, c. 1.Dion Cassius (42. c. 58) calls him Salatto. Suetonius (Cæsar, c. 59) also tellsthe same story. The African campaign is told by Dion Cassius, 43. c. 1, &c.Scipio avoided fighting as long as he could. Thapsus was situated on a kind ofpeninsula, south of Hadrumetum, as Dion Cassius states. But his description isnot clear. There were salt-pans near it, which were separated from the sea by avery narrow tract. Cæsar occupied this approach to Thapsus, and then formedhis lines about the town in the form of a crescent. Scipio came to relieveThapsus, and this brought on a battle. (African War, 80.) Cæsar could not stop

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture