genocide 2 - Genocide Genocide Kelsey Williams COL 106-02:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Genocide Genocide Kelsey Williams COL 106-02: First Year Seminar H Mrs. Alicia Sprow
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Rwanda Genocide 2 The United Nations is a group of world leaders that strive to keep the peace. A group of world leaders met in San Francisco in 1945 to discuss and create the United Nations Charter. The United Nations was officially formed on October 24, 1945. The purposes of the U.N., as stated by the charter are “to maintain international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to cooperate in solving international economic, social, cultural and humanitarian problems and in promoting respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms; and to be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations in attaining these ends” ( Basic Facts , 2004, ch. 2). Genocide is defined by the United Nations as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life, calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group”(OHCHR, 1948). If we were to take this definition and apply it to today’s world, we would find that there have been hundreds, if not thousands, of genocides. But, the U.N. has only involved itself in a few. One such example is Rwanda. In only 3 months, over 800,000 people were brutally slaughtered. There have been civil wars and general unrest in the country for as long as can be remembered, but this was different. The Hutus tried to completely annihilate the Tutsis although many were intermarried and they spoke the same language. The general dislike is traditionally
Background image of page 2
Genocide 3 believed to have been caused by the colonization by the Belgians. They saw the Hutu as inferior, and as a result, the Tutsis enjoyed better jobs, and educational opportunities. This finally had consequences in riots in 1959, when over 20,000 Tutsis were killed. Many of the Tutsis fled to Burundi, Tanzania and Uganda. The Tutsi became the “scapegoats” for everything, but there are no other recorded mass killings until the 1994 genocide. Everything culminated when the President of Rwanda, who was also a Hutu, was killed when his plane was shot down. The Hutus
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course COM 106 taught by Professor Sprow during the Fall '07 term at Alvernia University.

Page1 / 8

genocide 2 - Genocide Genocide Kelsey Williams COL 106-02:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online