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Scientific Method

Scientific Method - Scientific Method M Andrea Ward General...

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Scientific Method M. Andrea Ward General Biological Sciences
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THE WHOLE PROCESS There are different terms used to describe scientific ideas based on the amount of confirmed experimental evidence. Hypothesis - a statement that uses a few observations - an idea based on observations without experimental evidence Theory - uses many observations and has loads of experimental evidence - can be applied to unrelated facts and new relationships - flexible enough to be modified if new data/evidence introduced Law - stands the test of time, often without change - experimentally confirmed over and over - can create true predictions for different situations - has uniformity and is universal
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Standard Scientific Method The process whereby scientific theories are supported or rejected is called the Scientific Method. It is a systematic approach to advancing knowledge.
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Six Interrelated Steps OBSERVATION QUESTION HYPOTHESIS PREDICTION EXPERIMENT CONCLUSION
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Every Day Life Observation: car won’t start Question: Why won’t the car start? Hypothesis: The battery is dead. Prediction: If….then….. Experiment: Replace the battery Conclusion: The car started. The hypothesis was correct.
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Redi’s Experiment An example of the Scientific method is an experiment conducted in the early 1600’s by Francesco Redi. Redi used the scientific method to test the hypothesis that flies do not arise spontaneously from rotting meat.
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Flies swarm around meat left in the open; maggots appear on meat. Place meat in each jar. Obtain identical pieces of meat and two identical jars. Flies produce the maggots; keeping flies away from meat will prevent the appearance of maggots.
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Experimental variable: gauze prevents entry of flies Controlled variables: time, temperature, place Results Control situation Experimental situation Spontaneous generation of maggots
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