wk8discussionpost.docx - Lewy body dementia is a...

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Lewy body dementia is a progressive form of dementia that leads to a decline in thinking and reasoning that robs the individual of their ability to function independently incurable form of dementia (Alzheimer’s Association website, n.d.). Lewy body dementia is the 3 rd most common cause of dementia and accounts for 5 to 10% of the diagnosed dementia cases (Alzheimer’s Association website, n.d.). Those diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia experience movement symptoms such as rigid muscles, cogwheeling, shuffling gait, resting tremors, and have trouble initiating movements (Alzheimer’s Association website, n.d.). This debilitating disease comes with fluctuating levels of attention and alertness, visual hallucinations, systematized delusions, as well a falls, and syncopal episodes (Sadock, Sadock, & Ruiz, 2014). It is important for practitioners to complete a comprehensive work up when dementia is suspected. Individuals with this form of dementia have developed Lewy bodies (microscopic protein deposits on deteriorating nerve cells) in the midbrain region and in the cortex of the brain. Because of similarities in the development of Lewy bodies in the midbrain people are often misdiagnosed with having Alzheimer’s. Therefore, early detection and recognition is key. This disorder is “not a single disorder but rather a spectrum of closely related disorder” (Mago, 2018). Research indicates that there are two diagnosis of Lewy Body Dementia, dementia with

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