Emperor of China

Emperor of China - 1 Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
-11 Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of K’ang-hsi Allie Haidet Royalty. The word makes us think of so many things; power, riches, and longstanding traditions come to mind. The Chinese empire was slightly different from the typical European royal family. Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of K’ang-his , by Jonathan D. Spencer, explains the values, beliefs, and structure that the Chinese use in their government. It was a completely different world than Europe, and reading this book helped me realize this. In addition to having different ideals, the Chinese also had a different mindset towards the world around them. This bibliography is important to history for a couple of different reasons, including showing Chinese activity in the late 17 th and early 18 th centuries, and how they viewed the rest of the world. In Spencer’s book, we follow K’ang-hsi as he records his policies, personality, wisdom, and much more. It is divided up into five sections plus two valedictory edicts, one written by him and one by his scribes. Throughout all of K’ang-hsi’ works, he stuck to some key themes. While reading, I noticed that he constantly learned about his people
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 106C taught by Professor Raffensperger during the Fall '07 term at Wittenberg.

Page1 / 3

Emperor of China - 1 Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online