Final Paper RELG 260772413.pdf - Bhuvan Verma 260772413...

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1 Bhuvan Verma 260772413 RELG 271: Summer 2020 Final Paper Using two examples from the course, explore the ways in which sexuality has been implicated in/ impacted by colonialism, and how sexuality has been taken up as a tool for decolonization. Thesis Sexuality is a famously fraught term, framing some nebulous and tentatively unified junction of biological sex, gender, desire, and social relationships and structures. Male and female bodies as well as societal ideas defining cultural interpretations of masculinities and femininities are dominant metaphors for expressing one's identity in society, and religion plays a role of a guidebook reinforcing these meanings through mythical knowledge. The societal interactions between colonial ideals and indigenous values form a great example of cultural resistance through means of religious identity and sexuality. This paper focuses on the very resistance or ‘decolonization’ efforts of the natives against the colonial imposers through means of protection of cultural identity, be it spirituality or sexuality. The analysis is focused on the Indigenous and Hindu resistance against colonial culture, followed by a discourse on post-colonial feminism with a focus on Muslim women. Decolonialization: Indigenous culture and Hinduism Hundreds of cultures around the Americas had vocabulary relating to same-sex behaviours and non-binary, ambiguous understandings of identity long before universal LGBT rights appeared. Across the Hawaii Pacific, the mahū welcomes both the masculine and the
2 feminine. Global frameworks for sexual rights have not established referents for the recognition of alternative sexuality; indigenous languages already have them. Indigenous sexuality both predates and defies the current LGBT and queer frameworks. It is not the languages that are untranslatable, but the cultural and political fabric that they represent and that pose against the heteronormativity codes, which were the core tenets of the colonial empire. Sexuality was a land to view the natives as perverted and to justify European violence against non-Christians, who were branded as savages, heretics, and sodomites. The suppression of sexual identity reveals how sexual hegemony adopted patriarchal logics of dispossession, such as the theory of exploration, and why rejecting heteronormative codification is a decolonial activity. This paper emphasises the value of the life and resistance of Indigenous sexuality. It analyses colonial heterosexualization processes and explores aboriginal identity as a revival and self-determination site in order to combat continued modes of dispossession. Indigenous elimination manifestly proceeds through sedentary regulation of sexual relations, gender identity, marriage, reproduction, and genealogy, and through all similar means of constraining resistant indigenous national differences. Judicial processes in settlement law show this, as when the Indian Act of Canada created gendered exclusions to 'Indian citizenship' in 1876. Status ascription of the Act is always correlated with the ability to

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