APChapt3 - Chapter 3 Henry VIII aided the entrance of...

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Chapter 3 Henry VIII aided the entrance of Protestant beliefs into England when he broke England's ties with the Catholic Church. Colonists in both the North and the South established differences in the following areas: patterns of settlement, economies, political systems, and values. King James I opposed the Separatists who wanted to break away entirely from the Church of England because he realized that if his subjects could defy him in spiritual behavior, they could defy him as a political leader. The Separatists migrated from England to Holland to the New World in order to practice their purified Protestantism. Separatists were radical Puritans, were also known as Pilgrims, and authored the Mayflower Compact. The Mayflower Compact can be best described as a promising step toward genuine self-government. The leader that helped the Pilgrims survive was William Bradford. The historical significance of the Pilgrims of Plymouth Bay lies in their moral and spiritual qualities. Factors leading to the first major European migration include a population explosion, economic depression, and religious repression. Initially, the Massachusetts Bay Colony enjoyed all of the following advantages: being a well-equipped expedition, starting off on a larger scale than any other English colony, receiving many fairly prosperous and educated immigrants, and a shared purpose among the first settlers. Unlike other English voyagers to the New World, the Puritans transplanted entire communities. Puritans were Calvinists and were especially attracted England's economically depressed.

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