DG IPA (2) - IPA Lesson Plan Code-switching Instructional...

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IPA Lesson Plan: Code-switching Instructional Context: This lesson plan is intended for 11 th grade students enrolled in an ELL specific classroom in an urban Philadelphia high school. There are roughly twelve students in the ELL classroom with varying levels on the WIDA framework. Most of the students fall between the level three of developing and level four expanding. Many of these students are immigrants from countries such as Haiti, Guatemala, Ghana, Jamaica, and Morocco. Most of these students have been in the US for two or three years, while some have only been in the country for as little as three months. Some students however, are not English Language Learners but instead have been placed in the abridged English class due to low achievement. These students often have behavioral issues, lack the motivation they need to succeed, and are in need of constant support to keep them on task. Two of the students have IEPs for ADD/HD. The class is taught during a 90 minute period in the morning, so the students often come in tired and disinterested. This lesson will be taught in the beginning of the year as part of the first unit involving languages that we all speak. It is important that this lesson be toward the beginning of the year in order to establish a basic foundation of the different languages students speak as well as establish a relationship between the students that will grow throughout the remainder of the year. Additionally, and perhaps most the most important aspect of the lesson, is to establish a mutual understanding of respect between everyone in the classroom. Students will be asked to state their own opinions and experiences throughout the course, this lesson will serve as the gateway to what is expected of them for the remainder of the year. Goals:
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The goal of this lesson is to solicit students own ability to code-switch depending on the different situations they find themselves in throughout their lives. I will borrow concepts from a model teaching activity taken Lisa Delpit’s book The Skin That We Speak , the activity is titled “Trilingualism” created by Judith Baker. Other activities are borrowed from Michelle Devereaux’s lesson on Voice, Audience, and Code-Switching. By the end of this lesson, students should be able to understand the theory of code-switching and be able to realize exactly which “language” to use pertaining to the situation they find themselves in and why they use it. I will gauge the success of the lesson based on the level of responses from students in group discussions, as well as their personal responses from the handouts and activities. Also before students leave, their “ticket out the door” will be for them to respond to the “Lesson Reflection” handout. This handout will be a great determiner in what students took from the lesson, as well as ways to improve the lesson for future classes. Also for homework, students will respond to questions regarding the role play activity which will also be a good determiner of whether students took out of the lesson what the teacher desired.
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  • Spring '13
  • FrancisSullivan
  • John Baugh, Michelle Devereaux

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