28. Elderly_student 12.10.10

Changes physiological changestoorganfunction kidneys

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Unformatted text preview: mass (sarcopenia) Physiological Changes Physiological Changes to organ function Kidneys less able to concentrate waste Liver less efficient breaking down drugs Pancreas less able to control blood glucose Bladder control may decline with aging Psychosocial Changes and Concerns Psychosocial Medications May interact with nutrients May affect appetite May increase nutrient losses Income Psychosocial Changes and Concerns Psychosocial Isolation Decreased hearing and vision Decreased mobility Depression Alcoholism Dementia Percent of the Population Aged 65 and Over Living Alone, by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2003 42 39 29 22 19 19 12 8 Non-Hispanic White alone Black alone Men Asian alone Hispanic (of any race) Non-Hispanic White alone Black alone Asian alone Women Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Hispanic (of any race) Nutrient needs of older adults Nutrient Energy needs are typically reduced Loss of lean body mass Less physically active lifestyle Macronutrients Protein needs do not decline with age Fat metabolism does not change Maintain 20­35% of total kcal Carbohydrate needs 45­65% of total kcal Nutrient needs of older adults Nutrient Micronutrients Deficiencies may increase inadequate intake changes in digestion, absorption, and metabolism Calcium Vitamin D Iron B12 and folate Nutrient needs of older adults Nutrient Vitamin D Limited exposure to sunlight Best sources con...
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2013 for the course NUTR 300 taught by Professor Kirk during the Fall '08 term at University of Washington.

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