Richard - Richard The Animal Shakespeare uses animal imagery in many of his plays to give more details and better insight into his characters In

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Richard The Animal Shakespeare uses animal imagery in many of his plays to give more details and better insight into his characters. In King Richard III , animal imagery better defines the character of Richard III. It is used to establish his appearance, nobility, and behavior. Animal imagery is used to describe Richard’s appearance. Queen Margaret refers to Richard as "Thou elvish-mark'd, abortive, rooting hog" (Shakespeare I.iii.228). According to The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, abortive is defined as “Partially or imperfectly developed” (Dictionary “Abortive” Def.2). The word abortive perfectly describes Richard’s shriveled arm that had been deformed since birth. Queen Elizabeth calls Richard a “foul bunch-back'd toad” (Shakespeare IV.iv.81). Elizabeth is referring to the hump on Richard’s back. Bunch-backed is defined as “Having a bunch on the back; crooked.” (Dictionary “Bunch-backed” Def.1). Something that is crooked has a curve to it; similar to the way Richard’s back was humped. These
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course RHET 1101 taught by Professor Evans during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

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Richard - Richard The Animal Shakespeare uses animal imagery in many of his plays to give more details and better insight into his characters In

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