Developing a Philosophy for Teaching

Developing a Philosophy for Teaching - Developing a...

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Unformatted text preview: Developing a Philosophy for Teaching SCI 591 Background Knowledge for Developing a Philosophy Initially, inquiry seemed as though there was only one specific and correct way to be functionalized in the classroom. It seemed highly open-ended, almost as though the students were responsible for all of their own learning. However, I did believe that inquiry was more of a type of learning where the students would be able to connect experiences to there own life along with the subject trying to be taught. The intended goals that I thought were to be achieved aligned with my thoughts of what I thought inquiry was. I believed the goals would be based on the students ability to learn on their own, and the ability to come to their own conclusions without any guiding answers or help of any kind. Although I had some experience in another inquiry based class, I still had a vague understanding of what inquiry actually is. Over this past semester, I feel as though I have begun to develop a firm understanding of what scientific inquiry is. Inquiry is used as a guide for establishing goals and objectives, selecting instructional strategies and teaching techniques, and developing assessment procedures (including scientific thinking,...
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Developing a Philosophy for Teaching - Developing a...

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