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Analysis of Plato’s City-Soul Analogy Analysis of Plato’s The Republic, City-Soul Analogy In an elaborate effort to comprehend individual justice, Socrates engages in a lengthy debate which explores intricate details, structures, and overarching principles of a just city. This analysis will explore the City-Soul analogy through three separate human lenses. Section 1 will delve into the secondhand accounting of Socrates’ conversation, as recorded by his student Plato. Section 2, will analyze a political theorist’s perspective on the City-Soul. In the tertiary section, I will examine my own personal connotations in regards to Socrates’ City-Soul. As well as expose Socrates’ theoretically deduced reality in which he appoints himself God. Section 1 The City-Soul analogy comes about from Socrates’ rationality that the larger an object is, the easier it should be to read and understand. Since Socrates is committed to the determination of the true meaning and actions that exemplify justice and the just man, Socrates begins this cognitive quest by constructing a theoretical city in order to better understand man, who is physically smaller. Supporting the creation of this city are three other conversants: Thrasymachos a sophist, Glaucon and Adeimantos, who are brothers of Plato. The city is imagined from the ground up. This fundamental city starts with just four citizens, each of whom are expert craftsmen of a critical city-sustaining trade. Socrates notes that “A city, I take it, comes into being because each of us is not self-sufficient but needs many things.” (Plato p.153) Hence, cities are the psychical manifestations that support man’s growing needs and desires, and most notably, every man has a duty to support society in pre-determined role. Socrates affirms this by stating “we are not born all exactly alike but different in nature, for all sorts of different jobs…” (Plato p.154) Need help with the assignment? According to Socratic logic, One’s function within the city is thereby determined by each man’s naturally endowed talent. It is now indisputable that Socrate’s believes in a Devine power that assigns talents and thus roles to humans. The importance of this notion will be further explored in the third section. The analogy continues with the theme of assigning positions within the society, until the four men get to the artists. Compared to craftsmen and skilled laborers, artists produce more than tangible consumer goods. Artists of Socratic times include poets, painters, and fable makers. (Plato p.162) These positions in the city grant great power to those who occupy aforementioned professions. Art and culture are one in the same, that is each can shape the other. Art and culture have the power to carry on ideologies and specific ways of thinking. “Then first, as it seems, we must set up a censorship over the fable-makers, and gradesfixer.com

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