BA310-3-4 Operations Class Final - BA310: Social...

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1 BA310: Social Responsibility and Ethics
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2 Social Responsibility and Ethics Road Map Who are an organization’s stakeholders? Which stakeholders are management responsible to? What does that imply about how firms should act? What does the “ethics landscape” look like? What factors predict the outcome of ethical dilemmas? How do individual factors affect ethical decision-making – particularly the “stage of moral development?” What are four models of ethical decision-making? How can organizations encourage ethical behavior?
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3 BA310: Finishing Social Responsibility and Ethics
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4 What is Ethical in the first place? Four Conceptual Models Ethics: Rules and principles that define right and wrong conduct. Utilitarian Model: An ethical decision produces the greatest good for the greatest number of people. Greatest Good = Most favorable balance of benefits to harms for everyone affected. Example: Setting wages in the third world. “I believe in the power of free markets to make everyone better off in the long run. So, I pay the market wage.” Encourages efficiency. Can exploit those in weak positions. Probably the dominant view in business situations Moral Rights Model: An ethical decision best protects the rights and privileges of people affected by it. Example (continued) “I provide better working conditions than the law requires because I believe employees have a right to a safe and healthy workplace.” Consistent with fundamental values. Protects the weak. Can distract attention from production and efficiency.
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5 Ethical Decision Models continued Justice Model: An ethical decision distributes benefits and harms among stakeholders in a fair, equitable, or impartial (“follow the rules”) manner. Example (continued) : “I don’t pay women less for the same jobs because that is not fair, even though it is common to do so here.” Procedural (process) Justice vs. Distributive (outcomes) Justice Pros and cons similar to Moral Rights model. Social Contracts: An ethical decision is compatible with existing ethical norms in companies, industries, and regions Example (continued): “What I pay and my business practices generally are guided by what is normally done here.” Concern: What’s “normally done” may be unethical elsewhere.
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6 What’s considered ethical is different in different societies Bribery is the classic example Foreign Corrupt Practices Act makes it illegal for U.S. firms to knowingly corrupt foreign officials, yet some type of fee or payoff is expected in some countries Other areas where ethical standards vary Working conditions & workers’ rights Intellectual property protection Clarifying ethical guidelines is crucial for global firms Employees will otherwise be pulled in conflicting directions.
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7 A shades-of-gray ethical dilemma (disguised from a real situation) You are a division president in a high-technology firm.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BADM 310 taught by Professor G. love during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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BA310-3-4 Operations Class Final - BA310: Social...

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