ha.sec45.wp3.d2

ha.sec45.wp3.d2 - The Aromatic Power of Vainilla de...

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The Aromatic Power of Vainilla de Papantla : Land Reform and the Mexican Revolution Youngjoo Ha Writing 20—History and Food as Pleasure in Latin America Professor Tamera Marko Spring 2006 240 Hidden Bay Dr. Sumter, SC 29154 ygh@duke.edu 919-218-8310 or 803-469-2444
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Ha 2 Acknowledgement This paper is not what I intended to write when the writing project was first assigned, but I was intrigued by the story of vanilla in Papantla, Mexico, that seemed improbable at first. I have been fortunate enough to have advice from many teachers and friends. Professor Tamera Marko helped me every step of the way. She was there to help me choose the topic and to guide me in the research process. Ms. Danette Pachtner, the Film, Video & Digital Media Librarian and Ms. Greta Boers, the First-year Instruction Coordinator at Duke University Lilly Library dedicated their time and energy to help the first-year students be more familiar with the database provided by Duke University along with many other services the library has to offer. Ms. Colleen Lynch, the Duke University Undergraduate Writing Tutor, helped me brainstorm ideas and develop a meaningful theme. My classmates: Colin, Casey, Cassandra, Julia, Evelyn, Aaron, Aymara, Meg, Michael, Lauren, and Paul were there to give critiques and to make suggestions to improve my paper.
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Ha 3 A sudden demand for vanilla by the United States and European nations changed the lifestyle and economy of Papantla forever. Before vanilla became the main export and primary source of income in the eighteenth century, Papantla was a place of subsistence farmers who led quiet lives. It was unnecessary to grow a large amount of crops, so the idea of sharing the land—also known as communal landholding—was reasonable. When vanilla was discovered by Europeans who were willing to pay great amounts of money for the spice, however, the land became more expensive and caused the town merchants and to create haciendas , plantations operated by a wealthy owner. Injustice and inequality could be seen throughout haciendas and because there was little representation of the lower class in the government, a rift between the lower and upper class was prevalent throughout Mexico in the late 1800’s. One of the leading causes of the Mexican Revolution was the end of communal landholding. Ultimately, the popularity of vanilla resulted in one of the most devastating battles in the history. I will talk about the history of vanilla by explaining how it was first discovered by Spaniards and how it changed the economy of Papantla. I will also explain the concept of communal landholding and haciendas and how the land reform became one of the leading causes of the Mexican Revolution. Ultimately, I will make the connection between vanilla and social classes by explaining how vanilla, once the cash crop of Papantla, caused a rift between social classes. Until late nineteenth century, the farmers in Papantla chose not to live in villages
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ha.sec45.wp3.d2 - The Aromatic Power of Vainilla de...

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