Sonnet_18_Analysis_.pdf - Summary and Full Analysis of...

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Summary and Full Analysis of Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare Updated on January 28, 2019 William Shakespeare and Sonnet 18 Sonnet 18 is perhaps the best known of all sonnets. Shakespeare wrote 154 of them but this one tends to top most popular lists, mainly due to the opening line which every romantic knows off by heart. Owlcation Humanities Literature » » Andrew Spacey more Andrew has a keen interest in all aspects of poetry and writes extensively on the subject. His poems are published online and in print. Contact Author Summary and Full Analysis of Sonnet 18 by Will… Saved to Dropbox • Apr 11, 2019 at 8A28 PM
But there is much more to this line than meets the eye, as you'll find out later in the analysis. And please be aware that not every line of every Shakespeare sonnet is written in pure iambic pentameter - a mistake made by many a supposed authority. William Shakespeare's sonnets are world renowned and are said to have been written for a 'fair youth' (1 - 126) and a 'dark lady' (127 - 154), but no one is 100% certain. There are no definite names and no written evidence. Shakespeare may have been well known in his lifetime but he was also very good at keeping secrets. The sonnets were first published in 1609, seven years before his death, and their remarkable quality has kept them in the public eye ever since. Their depth and range set Shakespeare apart from all other sonneteers. His sonnet 18 focuses on the loveliness of a friend or lover, the speaker initially asking a rhetorical question comparing them to a summer's day. He then goes on to introduce the pros and cons of the weather, from an idyllic English summer's day to a less welcome dimmed sun and rough winds. In the end, it is the poetry that will keep the lover alive for ever, defying even death.
advertisement Sonnet 18 Sonnet 18 | Source Analysis Of Sonnet 18 Line by Line Sonnet 18 is devoted to praising a friend or lover, traditionally known as the 'fair youth', the sonnet itself a guarantee that this person's beauty will be sustained. Even death will be silenced because the lines of verse will be read by future generations, when speaker and poet and lover are no more, keeping the fair image alive through the power of verse.
The opening line is almost a tease, reflecting the speaker's uncertainty as he attempts to compare his lover with a summer's day. The rhetorical question is posed for both speaker and reader and even the metrical stance of this first line is open to conjecture. Is it pure iambic pentameter? This comparison will not be straightforward.

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