Nutrition3 - Nutrition Chapter 12 Lecturer T Snow Department of Agriculture"Healthy eating interactive Classes of Nutrients Essential nutrients are

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Nutrition Chapter 12 Lecturer: T. Snow Department of Agriculture “Healthy eating interactive”
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Classes of Nutrients Essential nutrients are those which must be obtained from the diet. Your body is unable to manufacture these nutrients, or cannot do so quickly enough to keep up with the body’s requirements. Nonessential nutrients can be either produced in the body from other nutrients or consumed in the diet.
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Elements of Your Diet Proteins Fats Carbohydrates Water Vitamins Minerals Macronutrients Micronutrients
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Proteins Proteins form important parts of the body’s main structural components : Muscles and Bone They are also found in enzymes, the blood, hormones, cell membranes. Amino Acids are the building blocks of proteins. Of the amino acids, 9 are essential and 11 are nonessential.
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Sources of Protein Complete sources (contain all the essential amino acids) -Animal Products such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, and cheese Incomplete sources (are usually low in one or two essential amino acids) -Plant Products such as nuts and legumes **Note: combining vegetable sources throughout the day can provide all required amino acids.
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Recommended Protein Intake Most Americans consume more protein than they need each day. Protein intake should be between 10-35% of the total caloric intake. (This corresponds to about 0.8- 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight) Protein from animal sources should be limited (3-6 oz/day). Protein from animal sources are generally high in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
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Protein as an Energy Source Protein can provide energy, but it is the body’s least preferred source of energy. Proteins provide 4 cal of energy per gram of
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HPS 1040 taught by Professor Surrency during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Nutrition3 - Nutrition Chapter 12 Lecturer T Snow Department of Agriculture"Healthy eating interactive Classes of Nutrients Essential nutrients are

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