L05.docx - Dana Hawkins CAS 100C Lesson 5 Part I Reasoning...

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Dana Hawkins CAS 100C Lesson 5 Part I: Reasoning in the Inaugural Address The Inaugural Address is one of the first introductions a US president gives to the nation. The president uses this speech to announce their particular plans and agenda for their presidential term. The specific purposes for each president’s speech varies based on the current constraints and resources. This essay will analyze three historic inaugural addresses, given by Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Barack H. Obama, for their usage of reasoning and supporting material to justify their perspective claims. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his inaugural address during the Great Depression to a nation in desperate need for hope and change. FDR’s specific goals contain the following parts: to deliver the audiences future policies to revive the economy, clarify the source causation of economic crisis, present the attitude of America under the lead of the new president towards international society, and finally, acknowledge the braveness of people in the United States. His speech was focused on hope for a brighter future and the recognition of present shortcomings. He detailed his plan for improving the country during the financial crisis. He specifically talked about the economy, international trade, and traditional American values. FDR claimed that “our greatest primary task is to put people to work”. (Franklin). He spoke of the workers facing turmoil and problems of existence, the collapsing industrial and agricultural environment, and the rising taxes. He also condemned the selfish money hungry bankers and the poor governmental leadership of previous administrations for the Great Depression.
In the inauguration address, FDR adopted many types of reasoning to support his claim. One of

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