Final Paper - "Dumb Jock Stigma 1 Running Head"DUMB JOCK...

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“Dumb Jock”: Stigma 1 Running Head: “DUMB JOCK”: STIGMATIZATION OR TRUTH “Dumb Jock”: Stigmatization or Truth Lisa Zanchi PSY 260-B
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“Dumb Jock”: Stigma 2 The common belief in our society is that athletes only excel in their sport and not the classroom. This idea has been labeled by many the “dumb jock” stereotype. David Myers (2005) defines stereotype as “a generalized (sometimes accurate but often over generalized) belief about a group of people,” in his book Exploring Psychology. An article called, “The athlete stigmas in higher education,” (Simmons, Bosworth, Fujita, Jensen, 2007) addresses theses prejudice ideas. It discusses how the outlook on athletes from the academic view point has become increasingly negative. Many professors and non-athletes at college institutions will make negative remarks or comments insulting athlete’s intelligence (Simmons, et. al., 2007). In a recent survey taken by 538 collegiate athletes of different races and genders all from a Division I-A school, the athletes revealed how they were perceived and whether or not they felt the effects of stigmatism. A stigmatized individual is one “who might have been received easily in ordinary social intercourse processes a trait that can obtrude itself upon attention and turn those of us whom he meets away from him, breaking the claim that his other attributes have on us,” as defined by Goffman (Simmons, et. al., 2007). In other words a stigmatization is a negative stereotype towards an individual or group of people based on a past experience or common belief. They were asked questions about how they were perceived by others within the college such as faculty and non-athlete students. They surveyed different races, genders, and types of athletes such as revenue athletes versus non-revenue. The majority of these athletes had the same response as to how professors and peers treat them on campus. 61.7% of athletes agreed that professors have given them a hard time and/or refused to accommodate them with extra help, sporting events, or make-up work. 33% claimed to be viewed negatively by professors and a shocking 59.1% said the same about non-athlete students. 62.1% of student-athletes surveyed have had a professor or faculty member make a negative comment about athletes or athletics in
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“Dumb Jock”: Stigma 3 class. In addition 370 student-athletes could recall and quote a negative remark made by a faculty member of non-athlete student (Simmons, et. al., 2007). In this article exploring the stigmatism in higher education they use the survey method to report results and analyze them. According to Myers (2005), the survey method is “a technique for ascertaining the self-reported attitudes or behaviors of people, usually by questioning a representative, random sample of them.” This particular survey method included a paper and pencil survey including questions concerning demographics as well as questions about academic experiences. They provided of a
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