Ulysses Annotated - Ulysses Annotated NOTES FOR JAMES...

This preview shows page 1 out of 696 pages.

Unformatted text preview: Ulysses Annotated NOTES FOR JAMES JOYCE'S Ulysses From David A. C hart, The SlOry o f Dublin (London, 1907) Ulysses Annotated NOTES FOR JAMES JOYCE'S Ulysses D on Gifford WITH ROBERT J . SEIDMAN SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED BY DON GIFFORD University of California Press Berkeley Los Angeles London T his v olume is u r evised a nd e xpanded e dition o f N otes f or J oyce: A ll A llllOl<l(ioll (!f Jame.1 J oyn:'s "U1YHt'5," b y D on G iffnrd \ vith R obert]. S eidman ( New York: E. P. D Ulton, I Q (4). T he m aps w ere d rawn by B eth C avri!!es. U niversity o f C alifornia P ress B erkeley a nd L os A ngeles, C alifornia U niversity o f C alifornia P ress, L td. L ondon, E ngland l I 0RR b y T he R egents n f t he U niversity o f C alifornia F irst p aperback p rinting 1 980 S econd p aperback p rinting 2 008 L ibrary o f C ongress C at;lloging-in-Publication l),Ha G ifford, D on. " Ulysses" A nnotated. Rev. c d. of: N otes f or j oyce. 1 97'l. I ncludes i ndex. 1. j oyce, j ames, 1 882--1941. U lysses. 1. S eidman, R obert]. II. G ifford, D on. N otes f or J oyce. I II. T itle. P R6019.09lJ6471988 8 23'.912 I SBN 9 78-0-520-25197-1 8 5-22262 P rinted in t he U nited S tales o f A merica 14 11 12 11 10 09 OR 765412 T he p aper u sed in this p ublication m cets t he m inimum r equin:mcnts ()r f \NSl/NISO Z 39.·1,s-1992 ( R 1 9(7) (FI.-'I"J!/ilJh'IICt' 0 / H lper) , t~3 l 've put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant, and that's the only way o f insuring one's immortality_ JAMES JOYCE PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ( 1974) THE NOTES AND T HEIR USE ix X liI XV INTRODUCTION NOTES FOR JOYCE'S PART I . Ulysses T he Telemachiad CONTENTS 9 EPISODE 1. EPISODE 2 . NeslOr 11 29 EPISODE 3· Proteus 43 PART I I. Telemachus T he Wanderings o f Ulysses EPISODE 4· Calypso EPISODE 5· Lotus-Eaters 6. H ades EPISODE EPISODE EPISODE 7· Aeolus 8. Leslrygonians 67 69 83 103 127 155 191 9· Scylla and Charybdis EPISODE 1 0. T he Wandering R ocks 259 EPISODE 1 I . Sirens 289 EPISODE EPISODE 1 2. Cyclops 313 EPISODE 14. O xen o f the S un 383 407 EPISODE 1 5. Circe 451 EPISODE 1 3. N ausicaa PART I II. The Homecoming 531 EPISODE 1 7. Ithaca 533 565 EPISODE 1 8. Penelope 609 EPISODE 1 6. E umaeus APPENDIX: INDEX Rhetorical Figures in Aeolus 635 645 S ince publication o f the first edition o f these annotations in 1974, responses from colleagues, s tudents, c orrespondents, and i nnumerable critics have made i t d ear t hat, even with the able collaboration of R. J. Seidman and the assistance of many others, I had as~ sembled something less than a definitive work~ iog annotation o f Ulysses. H ugh K enner sums u p the first edition succinctly: " By no means impeccable, b ut a good place to look first. 'l ' T his revised and enlarged second edition is still, o f course, b y no means impeccable, b ut I hope it is a b etter place t o look first. Some o f t he revisions report new discoveries that add t o t he excitement o f Joyce's text. Oth~ ers expand information in the previous edition-providing, for example, plot summaries o f operas, plays, a nd novels frequently alluded t o i n Ulysses. A nd t here remains the indigestible mass o f notes identifying inert things, " street furnishings" t hat r equire annotation to ensure that they remain inert, t hat t hey are overlooked instead o f over-exploited. Vico Road, for instance, is i n Dalkey, where Stephen teaches in the morning; a single mention o f Vico Road as the place where one o f S tephen's students resides does n ot necessarily introduce Giambattista Vico a nd the " rosary o f h istory" t o preside over the whole o f Ulysses. Twenty years ago I began this work o f annotating Joyce s purred by the pedagogical frustration described in the Preface to the first edition, reprinted below. Now, as I am about not to finish, b ut t o " abandon" (as Paul Valery would say) these revised notes for publication, there is a nother sort o f frustration: over one thousand additions and corrections since 1974, and still they c ome-as i f from the fabled pot o f lentils or, more appropriately, from that inexhaustibly hospitable ancient Irish soup pot, the caulderon o f M anannan Mac Lir, the god o f the sea. Richard M. Kain, in his review o f the first edition o f these notes, quite appropriately quotes Dr. Johnson's sage words: " Notes are often necessary, b ut they are necessary evils."Z T he a nnotator's role in accumulating those evils reminds me o f Swift's Gulliver in Glubbdubdrib, Offered t he opportunity t o s peak with the I H ugh Kenner, Ulysses ( London: George Allen and Unwin, 1980) p. 176. 2 ] ames]oyce Quarterly I I, no. 4 [1974]: 423. PREFACE TO T HE SECOND EDITION x Preface to the Second Edition ghosts o f antiquity, Gulliver is so crippled in imagination that he can think only to ask for mob scenes: Alexander the Great at the head o f his army, " Hannibal passing the Alps," a nd, as a sort o f a fterthought, Homer and A ristotlenot t o speak t o them (heaven forbid), but to see them with their commentators; a mob scene that produces not enlightenment, but a crowd the palace o f G lubbdubdrib cannot contain. Robert J. Seidman, who assisted me t o the point of co-authorship in the 1974 edition, had to step toward the wings during preparation o f this revised and enlarged edition. T he demands on his time would simply have been too great; even so, he turned up additional notes, reviewed the accumulation o f new and revised notes several times, and was prompt with support throughout. This new edition obviously had to be keyed to the text o f the Critical and Synoptic Edition o f Ulysses (New York, Garland, 1984). T he general editor o f the Critical Edition, Professor Hans Walter Gabler o f the Institute for English Philology at the University o f M unich, has been a model o f generosity and cooperation during the past four years. H e supplied me with the new reading text as it became available, including a collation with the 1961 Random House text to help me spot changes. With admirable patience and skill, his editorial associate, Claus Melchior, renumbered my lemmata and cross references in accordance with the new edition of Ulysses. Since publication o f the first edition o f these notes, I have received invaluable corrections and suggestions from colleagues, friends, and correspondents. T he desire to list them fills me with trepidation that I might fail to thank all who have offered help or to give t o each credit due. Particularly gratifying was help I received from correspondents who volunteered information o ut o f the blue: Edward Stewart o f Auckland, New Zealand, who helped considerably with the matter o f D ublin from a Dubliner's perspective; and Joan Glasser Keenan o f Wellesley, Massachusetts, whose meticulous and voluminous correspondence was an enormous help, as acknowledgments in the notes will attest. Roland McHugh interrupted the project of revising his monumental Annotations to Finnegans Wake ( London, 1980) t o forward over one hundred suggested emendations to this volume. I can only hope that my far less searching commentary on his project has been some compen- sation. Correspondence with Vincent Deane, editor-compiler o f A Finnegans Wake Circular, resulted in eighty-plus emendations and additions. O ther correspondents and commentators deserve my thanks: Professor Bernard Benstock, University of Miami; Professor Richard EHmann, Emory University; Professor H ugh Kenner, T he Johns Hopkins University; Tom Mac Intyre, Irish writer and playwright; Mary T. Reynolds, Yale University; and Professor Nathan Suskind. R. J. Seidman adds to this list: Professor Dorothy Bilik, University o f Maryland; Dr. Vivian B. Mann, T he Jewish Mu~ seum, New York; and Syrl Silberman, Media Producer/Consultant. Williams College is a "small college," and my colleagues there coped admirably with my preoccupations, nagging questions, and progress reports. Many o f t hem I thanked in the Preface to the first edition; many I m ust add, and many I must thank again. T he first edition was only a few weeks old when Clara and David Park (Department o f English and Physics Department, respectively) presented me with a pack o f fifty-odd 3 x 5 cards (pink slips, they were) to launch me toward this second installment. And so many others in the interim: from Classics, Professors Maureen Meaney Dietze, Charles Fuqua, and Meredith Hoppin; from German, Professor Edson Chick; from Russian (with asides in Italian), Professor Nicholas Fersen; from Philosophy, Professors Nathaniel Lawrence and Laszlo Versenyi (who helped with the Hungarian as well as with Plato); from English, Professors Robert Bell, Peter Berek, Arthur Carr, Stephen Fix, Lawrence Graver, Sherron Knopp, and John Reichert; from the Sawyer Library, the former librarian Lawrence Wikander and the present librarian Phyllis Cutler as well as that splendidly cooperative research staff, Lee Dalzell, Faith Fleming, Nancy Hanssen, Sarah McFarland, Barbara Prentice, and the assistant librarian Elizabeth Scherr. I m ust also include Robert Volz, custodian o f the Chapin (rare book) Library; Carl Johnson, Associate Curator o f the Paul Whiteman Collection; and Paula McCarthy Panczenko, who made field trips to Dublin. I wish to thank my Joyce c lasses-all those generations o f Williams College students who have used the notes and helped me t o develop them. Particular thanks go t o Theoharis C. Theoharis, Williams College 1977, who, in the years since his experience o f that course, has come t o function as a regular contributor t o this Preface to the Second Edition revision. D uring t he final months o f prepara~ rion, Susan Reifer (1985) and William Galloway (1984) helped by reviewing the manuscript; Robin Lorsch (1986) and Thomas Lydon (1986) checked the references to The Odyssey. I am also xi grateful t o Anne Geissrnan Canright for her skillful editing. Throughout the project Williams College has been most generous with research funding assistance. W ork on the present volume began i n 1962-63 as a continuation o f t he projects that resulted i n t he annotations o f Dubliners a nd A Portrait o f the Artisl as a Young Man, pub~ lished as Notes for Joyce (New York: E. P. D utron, 1967),1 As with those earlier projects, the decision to annotate Ulysses was a function o f t he somewhat frustrating and unrewarding experience o f t rying t o teach the book. I felt that far too much classroom time was given t o a parade o f e rudition, far too little to the actual pro- cess of t eaching-the discussion that comes to grips w ith the forms and textures o f the book itself. I was in effect encouraging my students to be overdependent on my information and t herefore on my readings. As I l aunched the annotations with a m imeographed and fragmentary set o f notes for t he first three episodes o f Ulysses i n 1 962-63, two things became clear: my students were able t o u ndertake independent readings o f those episodes; and my own grasp o f t he book was s potty-very spotty indeed-because I h ad relied on a fairly thorough reading o f isolated passages t o suggest what m ight be (but clearly was not) a thorough reading o f t he book as a whole. I n 1966 R obert J. Seidman, a former student, joined me in the enterprise. We declared a moratorium on writing and undertook t o complete the factual research. This approach enabled us to develop the basis for the annotations and to identify that wide variety o f things we knew we d id not know. T he actual writing began early in 1967, a nd in the academic year 1 967-68 we photocopied a draft o f t he notes to the first eight episodes for use with classes at Williams College. T hat exposure o f the notes gave us valuable information; students made helpful contributions t o the notes themselves and also helped us clarify what a thorough and essentially pedagogical annotation might ultimately be. T he s tudents made i t q uite clear, for example, that the context from which a literary allusion or a historical moment is taken should not just be cited, b ut s hould be briefly described I A second edition, revised and enlarged, was published as Joyce Annotated: Notes for "Dubliners" a nd "A Portrait o f the Artist as a Young M an" (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University o f California Press, 1982). PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (I974) XlV Preface a nd Acknowledgments (1974) a nd summarized so the reader could be oriented without consulting the original sources. T he p reparation o f t his volume has naturally involved considerable reliance on the body o f Joyce scholarship, Where the annotations are m atters o f fact from reasonably public realms, we have n ot t ried to identify the original discoverer-in p art because there have been i nnumerable simultaneous and overlapping discoveries, and in part because such identification and the comment it entails would imply a scholarly compilation (an annotation o f critical commentaries o n Ulysses), which has not been the p oint o f t his work (an annotation o f t he text itself). W hen Weldon Thornton's Allusions in "Ulysses" (Chapel Hill, N .C., 1968) was published, it seemed at first that what we had u ndertaken h ad already been accomplished. Indeed, Thornton's work and ours do overlap t o a considerable ex~ tent) b ut t he differences implied b y the terms " allusion" a nd " annotation" do suggest two dif~ f erent approaches a nd two different end products. Thornton's book has informed us on many p oints and has helped us immeasurably. At the same time our own questions and investigations have carried us i nto fields other than those Thornton has defined as "allusions/' and the hope is t hat the two books can be regarded as complementary attempts at different approaches to Ulysses r ather t han as m utually exclusive attempts at the same approach. I t is a challenge to try to acknowledge here o ur wide~ranging indebtedness to friends and associates and correspondents for their assist~ ance. We would like to thank the following for their varied contributions to this compendium: Theodore Albert, Williams College, 1963; Stephen Arons, Harvard Law School, 1969; M. Amr Barrada, Professor o f English, Williams College; M urray Baumgarten, Professor o f E n· glish, University o f California at Santa Cruz; A rthur Carr, Professor o f English, Williams College; Loring Coes I II, Williams College, 1971; James M. Cole, Williams College, 1968; Padraic Colum, Irish poet and critic; Thomas Foster, Williams College, 1969; John Garvin, Dublin City Commissioner; Marin Hay the; Mathew J. C. H odgart, University o f Sussex, co~author o f S ong in the Works o f J ames Jtryce; Sarah Hudson; J. Clay H unt, Professor o f En~ glish, Williams College; Nathaniel Lawrence, Professor o f Philosophy, Williams College; Nancy MacFayden, Library Assistant, Wil~ Iiams College; Roger McHugh, Professor o f Anglo-Irish Literature, University College, Dub~ lin; Holly McLennan; Benedict R. Miles (d. 1970), editor and proprietor o f the Gibraltar D irectory a nd Guide Book; Kathleen A. O'Connell, Secretary t o the President, Williams College; Daniel O'Connor, Professor o f Philosophy, Wil~ liams College; Ulick O'Connor, D ublin Man o f Letters; Robert O'Donnell, Professor o f English, Hofstra University; Iona Opie, co~author o f The Oxford Dictionary o f Nursery R hymes and The Language and Lore o fChildhood; Clara Park, Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, Massachusetts; Eric Partridge, English authority on slang and unconventional language; Anson Pi~ per, Professor o f Romance Languages, Williams College; Christopher Ricks, Professor o f English, University o f Bristol; Kenneth Roberts, Professor o f M usic, Williams College; R obert M. Ross, Professor o f English, University o f Pennsylvania; Charles Schweighauser, Williams College Center for Environmental Studies; Patti Seidman; Juanita Terry, Research Librarian, Williams College; Mabel P. Worthington, co~ author o f S ong i n the Works o fJ ames Jtryce. I would also like t o t hank the Williams Col ~ lege 1900 F und for grants in aid o f this project. D .G. p nmary intention of these annotations is p edagogical-to provide a specialized encyclopedia t hat will inform a reading o f Ulysses. T he r ule o f t humb I have followed is t o a nnotate aU i tems not available in standard desk dictionaries. As they now stand, the notes, even with the revisions, are not complete. Many of the incornpletions I know I do not know; there are undoubtedly other incoffipletions of which I am unaware; and some o f the complete notes are bound to prove inaccurate or inadequate. To t he e xtent t hat t hese flaws arc p art o f the formal traditions o f history, theology, philosophy, science, literature, and the arts, they s hould prove correctable. B ut o ther limitations derive from a central problem in annotating Ulysses: Joyce depended heavily for his vocabularies on the vernacular a nd oral worlds o f 1904 D ublin. T hose w orlds o f slang and gossip, anecdotal (as against formal) history, a nd p opular literature and culture are rapidly passing o ut o f living memory. T he effort to catch the nuances o f t hose informal vocabularies before they are lost is consequently o f critical importance. I have tried to balance o n t he knife-edge o f factual annotation and to avoid interpretive remarks. T his d istinction is something o f a legal fiction, since i t c an hardly be said that the notes d o not i mply i nterpretations o r t hat they do not derive from interpretations; but the intention has b een to keep t he n otes " neutral" so t hat t hey will inform rather than direct a reading o f the novel. T he ideal o f neutrality, however, has its drawbacks and has tended to overweight the annotations. Joyce was fascinated by what he called " Dublin street furniture," a nd he included vast amounts o f it in Ulysses. F or the most part that furniture is detail with no suggestive dimension beyond the f actual-streets, bridges, buildings, pubs, and shops are there: period. But occasionally something transfactual occurs: when Bloom twice places Wisdom Hely's, where he once worked, at nonexistent addresses (literally wishing Hely's out o f existence); or when Stephen passes Henry and James Clothiers and thinks o f H enry James; or when Stephen places the physics theater of Jesuit University College in the palace o f the archbishop of the Church o f Ireland. These oc~ casions and many less obvious ones seemed t o me t o require that all the " street furniture" be annotated, if only t o demonstrate, rather than to assert, that in most cases it is factual and in~ THE NOTES AND T HEIR USE XVI The Notes and Their Use e rt, as in life most such furniture inevitably is. O n a nother level, the catalogues, such as those o f I rish heroes and saints i n Cyclops, p resent a similar problem. Most o f the heroes at the be~ ginning o f the list are just t hat, I rish heroes who make one appearance i n the novel; b ut at least two o f t hem a re w hat S tephen would call the " indispensable informer," so the whole list seemed to require annotation. Similarly, the saints are saints, b ut t he list also includes ringers, such as Molly Bloom a nd t he dog Garryowen; so all were t o be included. Because even the well~informed r eader needs to know only that the street f urniture is there a nd in place, t hat t he heroes are heroes, the saints, saints, t he n otes may a ppear to labor an abun~ d ance o f t he obvious i n o rder t o r ender a few grains o f t he s ubtle a nd suggestive. Yet I c ould see no way a round s imply accepting the overweighting as a p roblem i nherent from the outset i n " neutral" a nnotations. T he a nnotated passages are presented in order o f o ccurrence-not u nlike the notes at the foot o f t he pages o f an edition o f S hakespeare o r Milton. T he n umerals before each annotat...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture