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ARTH 110 Project 3 FROM DTOP

ARTH 110 Project 3 FROM DTOP - Judd Andrews ARTH 110 Peters...

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Judd Andrews ARTH 110 Peters Assignment #3 11/13/07 Guest Curator: A Gallery exhibiting the evolution of nude women in art
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High Renaissance Sleeping Venus Girogione de Castelfranco, 1478-1510 Casa Marcello at Venice 108.5 x 175 cm This painting originates in the High Renaissance time period, which concluded the art of the Italian Renaissance. As displayed in this painting, the High Renaissance was common to works of art with a tranquil mood and luminous colors. However, this painting is also revolutionary to its time. This piece is the first of its kind, portraying a reclining nude; furthermore, Girogione placed his nude Venus directly in the focus of the painting, her arm up over her head, sprawled across the entire painting. Her body’s pose creates a long, continuous slope: her body’s curves mimicking the gentle slopes of the hills in the landscape behind her. Although this painting was so deliberately focused on the nude female form, it was accepted due to the subject. Since the painting was a depiction of Venus, a goddess, it was not conceived to be inappropriate. When people realized that the general public accepted nude paintings so long as they were entitled “Venus” much interest was sparked, and a new trend had begun. Artists were being commissioned to paint more and more of these Venuses. Wealthy men would commission artists to paint several Venus paintings for them, still capitalizing on the acceptance of Venus as a nude in art. Eventually, Venus became an extremely popular iconic figure.
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Second half of the 15 th Century The Birth of Venus Sandro Botticelli, 1444-1510 Uffizi Gallery in Florence 172.5 x 278.5 cm This painting was created in the second half of the 15 th century, a time in which artists focused more on the metaphysical world; more specifically, artists created depictions of supernatural and religious scenes, typically Roman Catholic. Botticelli, however, painted works of Pagan effect. This painting is unique as the great majority of Botticelli’s alleged Pagan paintings were destroyed in the flames of Savonarola’s bonfires, while this piece surprisingly escaped.
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