Essential_Terms - Rashida Jackson Term Definition 1 allegory .InDanteAlighieri's\"DivineComedy\"Dante,symbolizingmankind,is ,

Essential_Terms - Rashida Jackson Term Definition 1...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Rashida Jackson Term Definition 1 allegory A story illustrating an idea or a moral principle in which objects take on symbolic meanings. In Dante Alighieri's "Divine Comedy," Dante, symbolizing mankind, is  taken by Virgil the poet on a journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to teach him the nature of sin and its punishments, and the way to salvation. 2 alliteration Used for poetic effect, a repitition of the initial sounds of several words in a group. The following line from Robert Frost's poem "Acquainted with the Night provides  us with an example of alliteration,” I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet." The repitition of the s sound creates a sense of quiet, reinforcing the meaning of  the line. 3 allusion A reference in one literary work to a character or theme found in another literary work. T. S. Eliot, in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" alludes (refers) to the  biblical figure John the Baptist in the line Though I have seen my head (grown slightly bald) brought in upon a platter, . . . In the New Testament, John the Baptist's  head was presented to King Herod on a platter. 4 ambiguity A statement which can contain two or more meanings. For example, when the oracle at Delphi told Croesus that if he waged war on Cyrus he would destroy a great  empire, Croesus thought the oracle meant his enemy's empire. In fact, the empire Croesus destroyed by going to war was his own. 5 antagonist A person or force which opposes the protagonist in a literary work. In Stephen Vincent Benet's "The Devil and Daniel Webster," Mr. Scratch is Daniel Webster's  antagonst at the trial of Jabez Stone. The cold, in Jack London's "To Build a Fire" is the antagonist that defeats the man on the trail. 6 apostrophe A figure of speech wherein the speaker speaks directly to something nonhuman. In these lines from John Donne's poem "The Sun Rising" the poet scolds the sun for  interrupting his nighttime activities : Busy old fool, unruly sun, Why dost thou thus, Through windows, and through curtains call on us? 7 archetype An original model or pattern from which other later copies are made, especially a character, an action, or situation that seems to represent common patterns of  human life. 8 cacophony an unpleasant combination of sounds. The cacaphony in Matthew Arnold's lines "And thou, who didst the stars and sunbeams know,/Self-school'd, self-scann'd, self- honor'd, self-secure,/Didst tread on earth unguess'd at," is probably unintentional.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture