BTA1_Greece_2.4 - 28. In a series of diagrams, show the...

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28. In a series of diagrams, show the evolution of the Mycenaean palace form to the Classical Greek temple. 29. Discuss the optical refinements the Greeks made to their temples with respect to their world-view. How does this relate to Plato’s theory of Forms? How does this differ from the ideational approach of the Egyptians? The optical refinements the Greeks made to their temples with respect to their world-view changed the placement and proportions of the various parts of the temple as it was conceived in the mind. Before making adjustments, when the idea of the temple was realized physically it did not appear to the eye optically, the way the mind conceived it. The Greeks based these adjustments on the difference between the appearance of the temple to the senses and the way it is understood by the mind. In making these adjustments, the Greek architects made the temple appear physically to be identical to its ideal Form in the Platonic sense. Ironically, by making such adjustments the actual physical form of the temple conformed even less to this ideal Form. The approach of the Greek architects was one of idealization, which was realized
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optically. This was very different than the process the Egyptians used, which was ideation. This means that the Egyptian architect thought of architecture as representing a concept, an idea and, though obviously concerned with its appearance, he did not think so in terms of how the building appeared from any one or several particular vantage points. He was concerned that architectural form as it is constructed is absolutely identical to how it is conceived in the abstract. 30. The relationship of Greek temples to their surroundings is very important and yet we cannot say that the Greeks treated siting in a picturesque manner. Comment on this assumption in relation to one example from each of the Archaic and Classical periods. The relationship of Greek architecture to its site is not governed by its location.
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This homework help was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ARCH 2110 taught by Professor Bell during the Fall '07 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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BTA1_Greece_2.4 - 28. In a series of diagrams, show the...

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